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Published: Friday, June 17, 2011, 12:01 a.m.

Graduation rates at Snohomish County high schools

  • Mariner High School students attend their graduation ceremony June 9 at Comcast Arena in Everett.

    Sarah Weiser / The Herald

    Mariner High School students attend their graduation ceremony June 9 at Comcast Arena in Everett.

There are many measures for how well a school educates its students. Graduation rates are one, and they vary. Alternative schools often lag because their students are at risk of dropping out — for any number of reasons: They might be homeless or English language learners. They might be in unstable families. They might have mental health problems or be abusing drugs or alcohol. Below is a list of most high schools in Snohomish and Island counties and each school's on-time graduation rates, or how many among all students graduated within four years.

Search for your school's graduation rates  [Return to search again]

Click here to load this Caspio Online Database.

Key to data

Click through above to find in-depth data on any school. Here is how to interpret it: On-time grads: On-time graduates are students who took four years to graduate from high school. The numbers include students who changed high schools over the years. Total grads: Total graduates include students who took more than four years to graduate, but still did earn a diploma. On-time grads percentage: On-time graduation percentage relates to the total size of a class who started at a high school and the number who received a diploma four years later.

Raising grad rates

The Everett School District has been able to improve its on-time graduation rate from just 53 percent on time in 2003 to nearly 82 percent in the 2009-10 school year. It did so in part by identifying students during their freshman year who might be in trouble academically and at risk of dropping out. It has also hired “success coordinators” so that when a student fails a class, the family is contacted and a plan is devised to help them succeed in class and graduate.

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