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4-foot ‘alien' at Kayak Point really a lion's mane jellyfish

  • Oliver Pike, 7, poses behind a jellyfish at least 4 feet in diameter at Kayak Point Park last week.

    Sherman Pike

    Oliver Pike, 7, poses behind a jellyfish at least 4 feet in diameter at Kayak Point Park last week.

  • This big lion's mane jellyfish was found Thursday morning by Sherman and Oliver Pike, both of Tulalip.

    Sherman Pike

    This big lion's mane jellyfish was found Thursday morning by Sherman and Oliver Pike, both of Tulalip.

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Herald staff
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  • Oliver Pike, 7, poses behind a jellyfish at least 4 feet in diameter at Kayak Point Park last week.

    Sherman Pike

    Oliver Pike, 7, poses behind a jellyfish at least 4 feet in diameter at Kayak Point Park last week.

  • This big lion's mane jellyfish was found Thursday morning by Sherman and Oliver Pike, both of Tulalip.

    Sherman Pike

    This big lion's mane jellyfish was found Thursday morning by Sherman and Oliver Pike, both of Tulalip.

STANWOOD – Sherman Pike and his 7-year-old son, Oliver, knew they had found something unusual during their visit to Kayak Point park last week.
At first, they did not know what it was.
"My son thought it was an alien or a monster," said Pike, who is from Tulalip.
Luckily for him, his daughter had told him to carry his camera. He then took some pictures.
It wasn't until he got home that he learned the 4-foot pile of goop was actually a lion's mane jellyfish.
The jellyfish got stuck by the low tides, Pike said. He also made a video and uploaded it to YouTube.
This kind of jellyfish can grow up to 6 feet in diameter. Some have tentacles that can grow to nearly 30 yards long and can sting, even when the jellyfish is dead, according to the Pacific Wildlife Foundation website.
It is often found on Pacific Ocean beaches from Alaska to Mexico.

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