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Learn about the majestic swans that have returned to the Northwest

  • A trumpeter swan lands in a field in the Skagit Valley in 2007.

    Jennifer Buchanan / The Herald

    A trumpeter swan lands in a field in the Skagit Valley in 2007.

  • Biologist Martha Jordon holds a cygnet. Jordon is well-known for her work with trumpeter and tundra swans, as well as snow geese.

    Adopt a Stream Foundation

    Biologist Martha Jordon holds a cygnet. Jordon is well-known for her work with trumpeter and tundra swans, as well as snow geese.

  • Thousands of snow geese have migrated to Snohomish County from the north.

    Adopt a Stream Foundation

    Thousands of snow geese have migrated to Snohomish County from the north.

  • Thousands of snow geese have migrated to Snohomish County from the north.

    Adopt a Stream Foundation

    Thousands of snow geese have migrated to Snohomish County from the north.

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  • A trumpeter swan lands in a field in the Skagit Valley in 2007.

    Jennifer Buchanan / The Herald

    A trumpeter swan lands in a field in the Skagit Valley in 2007.

  • Biologist Martha Jordon holds a cygnet. Jordon is well-known for her work with trumpeter and tundra swans, as well as snow geese.

    Adopt a Stream Foundation

    Biologist Martha Jordon holds a cygnet. Jordon is well-known for her work with trumpeter and tundra swans, as well as snow geese.

  • Thousands of snow geese have migrated to Snohomish County from the north.

    Adopt a Stream Foundation

    Thousands of snow geese have migrated to Snohomish County from the north.

  • Thousands of snow geese have migrated to Snohomish County from the north.

    Adopt a Stream Foundation

    Thousands of snow geese have migrated to Snohomish County from the north.

EVERETT -- There's something almost magical about swans.
It might be something in their size or in their white feathers contrasting against a cold, steely Snohomish County backdrop.
Or perhaps its the way they travel from place to place, only arriving here for a brief time each winter.
"Something stirs in each of us when see swans," said Martha Jordon, a biologist who specializes in the birds. "And it's unique for each person."
She plans to share more about the birds in a class set for 7 p.m. Jan. 26 at the Northwest Stream Center, McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE.
The foundation also is offering a free showing of the movie "Winged Migration" at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Stream Center. Organizers want people to call to reserve a seat ahead of time.
Jordon said her aim is for people to enjoy the birds. She plans to talk about life history, biology and swan identification tips. She'll also share the best places to view them now.
Jordon also will shed light on the problems and controversies migratory birds face at their wintering grounds.
In this county, between 400 to 1,000 swans show up in the Snohomish Valley on any give year.
The swan numbers fluctuate because they move back and forth from farmland in Carnation north to the Skagit Valley.
To register for the class or a seat at the movie, call 425-316-8592.
The class costs $5 for Adopt A Stream Foundation members and $7 for everyone else.
Debra Smith: 425-339-3197; dsmith@heraldnet.com.


Story tags » EverettBird-watching

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