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More suspected tsunami debris on coast

  • Jerry Dean (left) and Russ Bryant display an abundance of floats, light bulbs, and bottles they found two weeks ago along the Long Beach Peninsula bea...

    Bill Wagner / The Daily News

    Jerry Dean (left) and Russ Bryant display an abundance of floats, light bulbs, and bottles they found two weeks ago along the Long Beach Peninsula beaches on Friday in Seaview. Dean and Bryant say the debris may have come from the tsunami which struck Japan a year ago.

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Associated Press
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  • Jerry Dean (left) and Russ Bryant display an abundance of floats, light bulbs, and bottles they found two weeks ago along the Long Beach Peninsula bea...

    Bill Wagner / The Daily News

    Jerry Dean (left) and Russ Bryant display an abundance of floats, light bulbs, and bottles they found two weeks ago along the Long Beach Peninsula beaches on Friday in Seaview. Dean and Bryant say the debris may have come from the tsunami which struck Japan a year ago.

LONGVIEW -- While most experts don't expect debris from last year's Japanese tsunami to wash up on West Coast beaches for another year, some suspected flotsam has been found on the state's Long Beach Peninsula.
Jerry Dean of Longview found several kinds of floats this month -- a clear glass float and net, a yellow plastic float and several larger dark floats.
The Daily News reported that Dean and his friend, Russ Bryant, also found four large light bulbs -- some marked with Japanese writing -- as well as assorted bottles and jars.
Earlier this year several large floats of the type used at Japanese oyster farms were found on the Olympic Peninsula and Vancouver Island.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is urging beachcombers to report unusual finds to marinedebris@noaa.gov.
Story tags » Tsunami

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