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Today in History

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Published:
Today is Saturday, June 2, the 154th day of 2012. There are 212 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight:
On June 2, 1953, Queen Elizabeth II was crowned in Westminster Abbey, 16 months after the death of her father, King George VI; it was the first such ceremony to be televised.
On this date:
In 1886, President Grover Cleveland, 49, married Frances Folsom, 21, in the Blue Room of the White House. (To date, Cleveland is the only president to marry in the executive mansion.)
In 1897, Mark Twain, 61, was quoted by the New York Journal as saying from London that "the report of my death was an exaggeration."
In 1924, Congress passed a measure that was then signed by President Calvin Coolidge guaranteeing full American citizenship for all Native Americans born within U.S. territorial limits.
In 1961, during a state visit to France, President John F. Kennedy, noting the warm reception his wife was receiving, jocularly described himself as "the man who accompanied Jacqueline Kennedy to Paris, and I have enjoyed it."
In 1966, the U.S. space probe Surveyor 1 landed on the moon and began transmitting detailed photographs of the lunar surface.
In 1979, Pope John Paul II arrived in his native Poland on the first visit by a pope to a Communist country.
In 1986, for the first time, the public could watch the proceedings of the U.S. Senate on television as a six-week experiment began.
In 1987, President Ronald Reagan announced he was nominating economist Alan Greenspan to succeed Paul Volcker as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board.
In 1997, Timothy McVeigh was convicted of murder and conspiracy in the Oklahoma City bombing. (He was executed in June 2001.)
In 2004, the syndicated TV game show "Jeopardy!" began airing contestant Ken Jennings' 74-game winning streak.
Associated Press

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