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Published: Friday, June 15, 2012, 12:01 a.m.

Pentagon to mark gay pride month

WASHINGTON -- Last summer, gays in the military dared not admit their sexual orientation. This summer, the Pentagon will salute them, marking June as gay pride month just as it has marked other celebrations honoring racial or ethnic groups.
In the latest remarkable sign of change since the military repealed the "don't ask, don't tell" policy, the Defense Department will soon hold its first event to recognize gay and lesbian troops. It comes nine months after repeal of the policy that had banned gay troops from serving openly and forced more than 13,500 service members out of the armed forces.
Details are still being worked out, but officials say Defense Secretary Leon Panetta wants to honor the contributions of gay service members.
"Now that we've repealed `don't ask, don't tell,' he feels it's important to find a way this month to recognize the service and professionalism of gay and lesbian troops," said Navy Capt. John Kirby, a spokesman.
This month's event will follow a long tradition in the Pentagon of recognizing diversity in America's armed forces. Hallway displays and activities, for example, have marked Black History Month and Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month.
Although some feared repeal of the ban on serving openly would cause problems in the ranks, officials and gay advocacy groups say no big issues have materialized -- aside from what advocacy groups criticize as slow implementation of some changes, such as benefit entitlements to troops in same-sex marriages.
Basic changes have come rapidly since repeal -- the biggest that gay and lesbian soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines no longer have to hide their sexuality in order to serve. They can put photos on their office desk without fear of being outed, attend social events with their partners and openly join advocacy groups looking out for their interests.
OurServe, a once-clandestine professional association for gay service members, has nearly doubled in size to more than 5,500 members. It held its first national convention of gay service members in Las Vegas last fall, then a conference on family issues this year in Washington.
At West Point, the alumni gay advocacy group Knights Out was able to hold the first installment in March of what is intended to be an annual dinner in recognition of gay and lesbian graduates and Army cadets. Gay students at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis were able to take same-sex dates to the academy's Ring Dance for third-year midshipmen.
Panetta said last month that military leaders had concluded that repeal had not affected morale or readiness. A report to Panetta with assessments from the individual military service branches said that as of May 1 they had seen no ill effects.
"I don't think it's just moving along smoothly, I think it's accelerating faster than we even thought the military would as far as progress goes," said Air Force 1st Lt. Josh Seefried, a finance officer and co-director of OutServe.
He said acceptance has been broad among straight service members and has put a spotlight on unequal treatment that gays continue to receive in some areas. "We are seeing such tremendous progress in how much the military is accepting us, but not only that -- in how much the rank and file is now understanding the inequality that's existing right now," he said.
That's a reference to the fact that same-sex couples aren't afforded spousal health care, assignments to the same location when they transfer to another job, and other benefits. There was no immediate change to eligibility standards for military benefits in September. All service members already were entitled to certain things, such as designating a partner as one's life insurance beneficiary or as designated caregiver in the Wounded Warrior program.
As for other benefits still not approved, the department began a review after repeal with an eye toward possibly extending eligibility, consistent with the federal Defense of Marriage Act and other applicable laws, to the same-sex partners of military personnel.
"The department is carefully and deliberately reviewing the benefits from a policy, fiscal, legal, and feasibility perspective," Eileen Lainez, a Pentagon spokeswoman said Thursday.
Gay marriage has been perhaps the most difficult issue.
Though chaplains on bases in some states are allowed to hold what the Pentagon officials call "private services" -- they don't use the words wedding or marriage -- such unions do not garner marriages benefits because the Defense of Marriage Act says marriage is between a man and a woman.
The policy known as "don't ask, don't tell" was in force for 18 years, and its repeal was a slow and deliberate process.
President Barack Obama on Dec. 22, 2010, signed legislation repealing it. Framing the issue as a matter of civil rights long denied, Obama said that "we are a nation that welcomes the service of every patriot ... a nation that believes that all men and women are created equal."
The military then did an assessment for several months to certify that the forces were prepared to implement it in a way that would not hurt military readiness. And it held training for its 2.25 million-person force to inform everyone of the coming change and what was expected.

Rules after repeal of 'don't ask, don't tell'
A look at some military rules following repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell policy," which for 18 years meant troops could be kicked out if they revealed their homosexual orientation.
A person's orientation -- or revealing it -- is no longer a bar to entering the service and can't be used expel someone.
Those discharged under the former policy may apply for re-entry and will be evaluated according to the same standards as all other applicants for re-entry.
Existing standards of conduct continue to apply to all service members regardless of sexual orientation. "All service members are responsible for upholding and maintaining the high standards of the U.S. military at all times and in all places," a Defense Department fact sheet says.
The creation of separate bathroom facilities or living quarters based on sexual orientation is prohibited, and commanders may not establish practices that physically segregate service members according to sexual orientation.
Troops continue to have some benefits for which they may designate beneficiaries, regardless of sexual orientation, such as for life insurance policies. Some other procedures are still being reviewed. And eligibility for a number of other benefits is restricted by law, including the federal Defense of Marriage Act, which says marriage is between one man and one woman.
The military cannot request, collect, or maintain information about the sexual orientation of service members except when it is an essential part of an otherwise appropriate investigation or other official action.
Service members can't get out of the military by saying they oppose the repeal or oppose serving with gay troops.
Story tags » U.S. MilitaryGay marriageLGBT

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