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Six injured in Friday's running of the bulls (gallery)

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Associated Press
  • Spanish bullfighter 'El Fundi' covers his head after being tossed by a bull during a bullfight of the San Fermin festival in Pamplona, Spain, on Thurs...


    Spanish bullfighter 'El Fundi' covers his head after being tossed by a bull during a bullfight of the San Fermin festival in Pamplona, Spain, on Thursday.

PAMPLONA, Spain — Six people were injured Friday but none gored during the second-to-last day of the running of the bulls in Pamplona.
Navarra Hospital said all six were hurt — in the back, arm, face or leg — in falls or when they were stepped on during a very fast run with bulls from a Seville ranch known for particularly swift dashes at Spain's most popular summer festival.
One light brown bull running at the edge of the pack knocked people down as if they were rag dolls.
Half-way through the run, one man fell to the cobblestone streets of the city's old quarter and got up to find several hulking bulls, along with the bell-tinkling steers that run with them, right on top of him. He managed to scurry away to safety.
The pack spread out fairly early in the two-and-half minute run, which is not good: bulls running on their own can become disoriented, thus are more likely to charge at people. Still, no one got gored.
The hospital said one injured man's face had been stood on, but it was not clear if it was a human foot or a bull's hoof that got him.
Two of the injured were Americans: a 36-year-old with a fractured forearm, and a 28-year-old with a face injury. The other injured were three Spaniards and a Jordanian.
The San Fermin festival, known for its virtually non-stop drinking and revelry, became world famous with Ernest Hemingway's novel "The Sun Also Rises."
The last of eight runs is Saturday. Afterward, revelers bemoan the end of the party by singing a song called "Pobre de Mi," which can be translated as "woe is me."

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