The Herald of Everett, Washington
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Published: Monday, September 3, 2012, 12:01 a.m.

The Grid: Photos of Everett as it grew up

  • A carload of flag-waving patriots celebrate the end of World War I in 1918 during a Victory Parade passing in front of the Mitchell Hotel on Lombard A...

    Everett Public Library

    A carload of flag-waving patriots celebrate the end of World War I in 1918 during a Victory Parade passing in front of the Mitchell Hotel on Lombard Avenue. The street was named for a capitalist, Benjamin Lombard, but grew to be the home of local labor movement.

  • Police officers pose on Broadway Avenue in front of their station house and with one of their cruisers in this photo, taken about 1911. The police sta...

    Everett Public Library

    Police officers pose on Broadway Avenue in front of their station house and with one of their cruisers in this photo, taken about 1911. The police station shared a building with Everett's first City Hall, making it the city's municipal center for a time. Both City Hall and the police station have since moved to Wetmore Avenue, also in the downtown core.

  • The Carnegie Building, 3001 Oakes Ave., started out as the city's first library. Built in 1905 and patterned on the Boston Public Library, it now clai...

    Everett Public Library

    The Carnegie Building, 3001 Oakes Ave., started out as the city's first library. Built in 1905 and patterned on the Boston Public Library, it now claims a spot on the National Register of Historic Places. The street, Oakes, got its name from Thomas Fletcher Oakes, an early investor in Everett.

  • Located outside the downtown core, Longfellow School at 3715 Oakes Avenue was designed by architect Wesley Warren Hastings and named for the famed poe...

    Everett Public Library

    Located outside the downtown core, Longfellow School at 3715 Oakes Avenue was designed by architect Wesley Warren Hastings and named for the famed poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The school also was where Sen. Henry "Scoop" Jackson began his education as a boy. The street got its name from Thomas Fletcher Oakes, an early investor in Everett.

This summer, we have been detailing the history of the city's downtown streets in our series, "The Grid." Next week, we'll conclude that series. First, though, we wanted to share some of our favorite snapshots of early Everett, from its childhood onward, along with some modern-day photos for comparison. Click here for the gallery. Enjoy!
Cast your vote!
In June, we challenged our readers to come up with a mnemonic device to remember the order of Everett's downtown streets: Broadway, Lombard, Oakes, Rockefeller, Wetmore, Colby, Hoyt, Rucker and Grand. More than 100 of you sent in a total of roughly 190 ideas. Here are our favorites. Vote for your top pick below by the end of the day Thursday, and we'll announce the winner next Monday. The one that gets the most votes wins a prize.



Story tags » Historical SitesEverettHistorySnohomish County history

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