The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up  Green editions icon Green editions
Published: Thursday, September 20, 2012, 12:01 a.m.

A Hurricane with the heart of a Buick

  • The casing on the cylinder bank of this Hurricane sports the Buick imprint.

    Cory Graff / Flying Heritage Collection

    The casing on the cylinder bank of this Hurricane sports the Buick imprint.

Automobile companies turned to other jobs when war swept the world. The FHC's Focke-Wulf Fw 190 is powered by a BMW engine. The Messerschmitt Bf 109 has a Daimler-Benz powerplant. The Allison engine in the P-40 Tomahawk is a product of General Motors. And, of course, the P-51 Mustang cruises along with a Packard under the cowl.

We had an interesting discovery lately with one of our other Packard Merlin-powered planes. If you look closely on the side of the casing for the cylinder banks in the Hurricane … (See photo.)

Packard couldn't make all of those engines by themselves. In fact, factories at Lincoln, Ford, Cadillac, Buick, and Marmon built Merlin engines along with Packard Motor Car Company. Somewhere during the engine installation process for the FHC's Hurricane, someone must have asked that once-famous advertising tagline, “Wouldn't you really rather have a Buick?”
Story tags » General Aviation

Subscribe to HeraldNet Newsletters
See sample | Privacy policy

Most recent Flight Paths posts

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus
digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

loading...
» More Aerospace