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Facebook launches new help center

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Washington Post
Published:
Facebook has redesigned its help center and dashboard in an effort to better help users navigate its privacy settings and to lead them to new features on the site.
The new help hub, launched Tuesday, gives users a central location for learning how to manage privacy on the social media site and for reading up on changes to Facebook's layout, such as the Timeline. Users can click on a link to learn about Facebook's newest games and other applications.
The company recently launched an app store, in part to showcase companies that have programs that work with the social network's real-time activity feed.
Facebook has also revamped its support dashboard, which was under review and is now available to users worldwide. The dashboard will now allow users to keep track of photo or profile issues that were flagged during the review process. Facebook will alert users as reports move through its system, explaining the actions the company took on the matter.
"Both of these tools aim to provide the people who use our service with access to the information they need from Facebook as quickly and as efficiently as possible," said Erin Egan, Facebook's chief privacy officer, said. "These resources demonstrate our commitment to transparency and our continued effort to ensure that the people who use Facebook can create the experience that is right for them."
Since making its stock market debut May 18, the social network giant has had to walk a fine line in trying to heed investor calls for a more sustainable ad model while also maintaining trust with users who are increasingly wary of the company's privacy policies.
In a blog post Sunday, the company laid out some of the ways in which it works with advertising partners and explained how it measures its advertising performance through a partnership with the analytics firm Datalogix. The company stressed that no personal information should be attributable to a single user.
On Saturday, privacy groups sent a request to the Federal Trade Commission to assess whether the partnership with Datalogix complied with Facebook's agreement to keep users informed of changes to its privacy settings.
Facebook addressed the concerns in the next day's blog post. Privacy engineer Joey Tyson said that the company had an auditing firm vet the privacy implications of its relationship with Datalogix and that the firm found that none of the data Datalogix accesses can be "attributable to an individual Facebook user."
Facebook stock bumped up recently after the company announced a plan to distribute physical goods through a system called Facebook Gifts. But the social network and chief executive Mark Zuckerberg still have to convince investors that its stock is not, as Barron's suggested last week, "too pricey."
(Washington Post Co. chairman and chief executive Don Graham is a member of Facebook's board of directors.)

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