The Herald of Everett, Washington
Customer service  |  Subscribe   |   Log in or sign up   |   Advertising information   |   Contact us
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up  Green editions icon Green editions

Vinaigrettes not just for salads

Use them to season vegetables and meat

  • Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Red Leaf Salad with Rasp...

    Jarrad Henderson / Detroit Free Press

    Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Red Leaf Salad with Raspberry Vinaigrette.

  • Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Fifty shades of Greens S...

    Diane Weiss / Detroit Free Press

    Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Fifty shades of Greens Salad with Lime Vinaigrette.

  • Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish.

    Diane Weiss / Detroit Free Press

    Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish.

  • Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Corn Salad with Cilantro...

    Diane Weiss / Detroit Free Press

    Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Corn Salad with Cilantro and pepper vinaigrette.

SHARE: facebook Twitter icon Pinterest icon Linkedin icon Google+ icon Email icon |  PRINTER-FRIENDLY  |  COMMENTS
By Susan M. Selasky
Detroit Free Press
Published:
  • Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Red Leaf Salad with Rasp...

    Jarrad Henderson / Detroit Free Press

    Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Red Leaf Salad with Raspberry Vinaigrette.

  • Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Fifty shades of Greens S...

    Diane Weiss / Detroit Free Press

    Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Fifty shades of Greens Salad with Lime Vinaigrette.

  • Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish.

    Diane Weiss / Detroit Free Press

    Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish.

  • Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Corn Salad with Cilantro...

    Diane Weiss / Detroit Free Press

    Vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish. Here, Corn Salad with Cilantro and pepper vinaigrette.

Knowing how to make a variety of vinaigrettes is a kitchen skill every cook should have.
Why?
Because it is simple and saves money.
And vinaigrettes are not just for salad greens. You can drizzle them on fresh cooked vegetables or grilled chicken or fish.
A vinaigrette consists of three parts oil to one part vinegar (or other acid) along with salt and pepper.
Once you have that down, you can experiment with different vinegars, oils and seasonings.
Theresa Gemus, of Riverview, Mich., has never been a fan of bottled vinaigrettes.
"They were either too bitter or just didn't make the salad taste good and left a bad taste in my mouth," she said.
So she makes her own vinaigrette -- directly on the salad. She seasons first, adds vinegar and then adds the oil.
Gemus said making her own vinaigrette allows her to control the flavors.
"I can ad lib on the seasoning flavors kind of on the fly," she said. "And depending what I am making for dinner, I can change those vinegars."
Mary Spencer, a culinary instructor, also prefers to make her own vinaigrette because she can control the quality of the ingredients.
"It's using good quality vinegars, some quality olive oils," said Spencer, who offers cooking classes at Taste: A Cook's Place, in Epiphany Kitchens in Northville, Mich.
To bring the dressing together, use an emulsifier such as Dijon, which "gives it a little tang," she said.
Another tip: Spencer recommends making the vinaigrette in the bottom of the salad bowl and then adding salad greens and other ingredients and tossing them with the vinaigrette.
"You want enough vinaigrette to lightly coat the leaves," Spencer said.
"I think when you use something that is ready- made you squirt it on and sometimes you over do it," she said.
"Making your own just tastes so much better."
50 shades of greens salad
Vinaigrette
3 tablespoons good quality olive oil
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons honey
Big pinch of kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Salad
1 large head Boston lettuce, largest outer leaves and damaged leaves removed; remainder washed, dried and torn into bite-size pieces
3/4 cup loosely packed mix of fresh flat and curly parsley leaves
1 small bunch frisée, torn into pieces
1 cup arugula leaves
2 to 3 green onions, thinly sliced on the diagonal
1 small ripe but firm avocado
In a small bowl, combine all the vinaigrette ingredients and whisk until thoroughly emulsified.
In a large mixing bowl, combine the lettuce, parsley, frisée, arugula and green onions. Drizzle with about 2 tablespoons of the vinaigrette. Evenly divide the salad greens onto four salad plates.
Cut the avocado in half and remove the pit. Scoop out the flesh in one piece. Slice each half crosswise in thin half-moons. Drizzle the avocado with a bit of the vinaigrette and then arrange several slices on each salad. Add another drizzling of vinaigrette, if desired, over each salad.
Makes 4 servings. Per serving: 200 calories (77 percent from fat), 17 grams fat (3 grams sat. fat), 12 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams protein, 130 mg sodium, 0 mg cholesterol, 8 grams fiber.
Adapted from Fine Cooking magazine 2005. Tested by Susan M. Selasky in the Free Press Test Kitchen.

Basic Dijon vinaigrette
1 tablespoon finely minced shallots
1/2-1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2-1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon red or white wine vinegar
1/3-1/2 cup good quality olive oil
Freshly ground pepper
Fresh chopped herbs, if desired
In a small bowl stir together the shallots, Dijon and salt. Whisk in the lemon juice and vinegar until blended. When well blended, start whisking in the oil, in a steady stream until it forms a smooth emulsion. Taste and adjust seasonings. Finish with a pinch of freshly ground black pepper and herbs, if using.
Makes 2/3 cup, enough for eight servgins. Per serving: 59 calories (97 percent from fat), 7 grams fat (1 gram sat. fat), 0 grams carbohydrates, 0 grams protein, 62 mg sodium, 0 mg cholesterol, 0 grams fiber.
From and tested by Susan M. Selasky in the Free Press Test Kitchen.
Shaved zucchini salad with Parmesan and pine nuts
1/3 cup good quality olive oil
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
2 pounds medium zucchini, trimmed
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh basil
1/4 cup pine nuts or blanched almonds, toasted
Small wedge of Parmesan cheese
In a small bowl, whisk oil, lemon juice, salt, black pepper and crushed red pepper. Set dressing aside.
Using vegetable peeler or V-slicer and working from top to bottom of each zucchini, slice zucchini into ribbons (about 1/8-inch thick). Place ribbons in large bowl. Add basil and nuts, then dressing; toss to coat. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Plate salad on individual plates. Using vegetable peeler, shave strips from Parmesan wedge over salad.
Makes 6 servings. Per serving: 187 calories (84 percent from fat), 18 grams fat (2.5 grams sat. fat), 6 grams carbohydrates, 4 grams protein, 247 mg sodium, 2 mg cholesterol, 2 grams fiber.
From www.bonappetit.com. Tested by Susan M. Selasky in the Free Press Test Kitchen.

Tomato Caesar salad with bacon-Parmesan crisps
2 slices cooked, crisp, thick-cut bacon
1/2 cup plus 3 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese, divided
1 1/2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
4 anchovy fillets, rinsed and minced
1 small clove garlic, minced
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for drizzling
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
5 medium or large heirloom tomatoes, sliced crosswise 1/2-inch thick
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
Baby arugula or watercress, for topping
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Finely chop the cooked bacon.
In a small bowl, mix together the bacon, 1/2 cup Parmesan and flour. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Divide the bacon-cheese mixture into 4 mounds on baking sheet and flatten them into 3 1/2-inch rounds. Bake until golden brown and the cheese melts, about 7-8 minutes. Let cool on the baking sheet 5 minutes, then transfer to a rack using a thin spatula and let cool completely.
To make the vinaigrette: In a small bowl, whisk the anchovies, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, Worcestershire sauce and the remaining 3 tablespoons of cheese.
Arrange the tomatoes on a platter, sprinkling each layer with salt, pepper and some of the vinaigrette. Scatter the watercress on top and drizzle with olive oil. Break the crisps into bite-size pieces and add to the salad.
Makes 6 servings. Per serving: 130 calories (58 percent from fat), 9 grams fat (3 grams sat. fat), 8 grams carbohydrates, 7 grams protein, 532 mg sodium, 12 mg cholesterol, 2 grams fiber.
Adapted from Food Network magazine, September 2012 issue. Tested by Susan M. Selasky in the Free Press Test Kitchen.
Mix and match
Vinaigrettes are generally three parts oil to one part vinegar. So, to make about 1 cup vinaigrette you will need 3/4 cup oil and 1/4 cup vinegar or other acidic liquid. Exact amounts vary from recipe to recipe; the key is to adjust ingredients to taste. Here are some tips and a list of essential ingredients.
Tips
Have all the ingredients at room temperature so vinaigrette emulsifies more easily.
While whisking, drizzle the olive oil in slowly and in a steady stream. The mixture should slowly come together, emulsify and look creamy.
Make vinaigrettes up to three days in advance and refrigerate. When you make the salad, place the greens in a bowl and add the vinaigrette a few tablespoons at a time so it just coats the greens.
Ingredients
Oil: Good quality fruity or mild olive oil, canola oil, grapeseed, nut oils such as walnut.
Vinegars or acids: Balsamic (white or dark), champagne, apple cider vinegar, fresh lemon or lime juice, fruit varieties (such as cranberry, pear or raspberry), orange juice, red or white wine vinegar, sherry vinegar, rice (seasoned or unseasoned) for an Asian spin, plain white vinegar.
Seasonings: Salt and pepper, Dijon mustard, fresh or dried herbs, minced garlic, minced ginger, honey, lemon or lime zest, chopped nuts, soy sauce (for Asian spin), minced shallots and sugar.


Story tags » Cooking

More Life Headlines

NEWSLETTER

Weekend to-do list

Our to-do list full of ideas for your weekend

Calendar

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus