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A movie buff's guide to San Francisco's sights

  • San Francisco's Fort Point, under the fog-covered Golden Gate Bridge, is the spot where Jimmy Stewart saved Kim Novak in "Vertigo."

    Associated Press/Eric Risberg

    San Francisco's Fort Point, under the fog-covered Golden Gate Bridge, is the spot where Jimmy Stewart saved Kim Novak in "Vertigo."

  • John's Grill, one of the San Francisco's oldest restaurants, was a setting in author Dashiell Hammett's "The Maltese Falcon." The interior l...

    Associated Press/Eric Risberg

    John's Grill, one of the San Francisco's oldest restaurants, was a setting in author Dashiell Hammett's "The Maltese Falcon." The interior looks just as you would picture it from the book, filled with original period furnishings. The walls are covered with photos of famous customers and the second floor has a replica of the falcon, along with movie stills and foreign translations of the novel.

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By John Marshall
Associated Press
Published:
  • San Francisco's Fort Point, under the fog-covered Golden Gate Bridge, is the spot where Jimmy Stewart saved Kim Novak in "Vertigo."

    Associated Press/Eric Risberg

    San Francisco's Fort Point, under the fog-covered Golden Gate Bridge, is the spot where Jimmy Stewart saved Kim Novak in "Vertigo."

  • John's Grill, one of the San Francisco's oldest restaurants, was a setting in author Dashiell Hammett's "The Maltese Falcon." The interior l...

    Associated Press/Eric Risberg

    John's Grill, one of the San Francisco's oldest restaurants, was a setting in author Dashiell Hammett's "The Maltese Falcon." The interior looks just as you would picture it from the book, filled with original period furnishings. The walls are covered with photos of famous customers and the second floor has a replica of the falcon, along with movie stills and foreign translations of the novel.

SAN FRANCISCO -- The spot where Jimmy Stewart saved Kim Novak in "Vertigo" is at Fort Point, just under the base of the Golden Gate Bridge.
A few miles down the bay is Alcatraz, where Nicolas Cage and Sean Connery prevented missiles from launching and Clint Eastwood may or may not have escaped.
Filled with iconic landmarks, breathtaking scenery and a wide range of locations, San Francisco has a long history as a favorite site for filmmakers -- and the movie buffs who want to see the places where their favorite scenes were filmed.
The city's long history of film offers plenty of iconic spots to visit. Here are just a few;
ALCATRAZ: In "Birdman of Alcatraz," "Escape from Alcatraz," "Murder in the First," "The Rock," "The Enforcer."
A federal penitentiary from 1934 to 1963, "The Rock" housed notorious criminals and is now a national park. Alcatraz offers visitors a chance to tour the prison, including a look at one of the cells portrayed in Eastwood's "Escape from Alcatraz," with the concrete chipped away behind the vent. www.alcatrazcruises.com/.
FORT POINT, GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE: In "Foul Play," "Dopamine," "High Anxiety," "Petulia," "Point Blank," "Vertigo," "The Presidio."
Built to protect the San Francisco Bay from Confederate and foreign attack during the Civil War, Fort Point is where Stewart saved Novak in "Vertigo," right at the base. The bridge has also been blown up countless times on film, including in "X-Men 3" and "Monsters vs. Aliens." Best view is from the north side back toward the city.
COIT TOWER: In "Boys & Girls," "After the Thin Man," "Dr. Dolittle," "Sister Act 2," "The Enforcer," "The Presidio," "The Rock," "Innerspace."
The narrow, white concrete column atop Telegraph Hill has been a part of San Francisco's skyline since 1933 and offers spectacular views of the bay and the city. Coit Tower has been in the backdrop of numerous movies filmed in San Francisco. sfrecpark.org/CoitTower.aspx.
CITY HALL: In "A View to a Kill," "Bedazzled," "Bicentennial Man," "Class Action," "Final Analysis," "Foul Play," "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," "Jagged Edge," "Magnum Force," "Milk," "The Rock," "The Wedding Planner."
City Hall has one of the largest domes in the world and replaced a structure destroyed in the 1906 earthquake.
It was used extensively at the end of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and Sean Penn, in his Academy Award-winning portrayal of gay rights activist Harvey Milk, gave an impassioned speech on its steps.
ALAMO SQUARE: In "Murder in the First," "Nine Months," "The Conversation," "Mrs. Doubtfire."
The Painted Ladies, a row of Victorian houses facing the park on Steiner Street, have been a favorite of film and television producers and were used in the opening shot for the sitcom "Full House."
The house where Robin Williams dressed up as Mrs. Doubtfire posing as his ex-wife's nanny is north of the park at Steiner and Broadway.
WHERE TO EAT: One of the city's oldest restaurants, John's Grill, 63 Ellis St., was a setting in author Dashiell Hammett's "The Maltese Falcon." The interior is filled with original period furnishings.
The walls are covered with photos of famous customers and the second floor has a replica of the Maltese Falcon.
WHERE TO STAY: A quaint boutique hotel, the Bijou, 111 Mason near Union Square, offers the full Hollywood-in-San Francisco experience.
The hotel is designed in the theme of classic movie palace.
Each room is named after a movie shot in San Francisco and there's a mini movie theater off the lobby that shows nightly double features of San Francisco-based movies. www.hotelbijou.com.
SAN FRANCISCO MOVIE TOURS: www.sanfranciscomovietours.com/.
Story tags » MoviesTravel

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