Like The Herald Business Journal on Facebook!
The Herald of Everett, Washington
Heraldnet.com

The top local business stories in your email

Contact Us:

Josh O'Connor
Publisher
Phone: 425-339-3007
joconnor@heraldnet.com

Jody Knoblich
General Sales Manager
Phone: 425-339-3445
Fax: 425-339-3049
jknoblich@heraldnet.com

Jim Davis
Editor
Phone: 425-339-3097
jdavis@heraldnet.com

Site address:
1800 41st Street, S-300,
Everett, WA 98203

Mailing address:
P.O. Box 930
Everett, WA 98206

HBJ RSS feeds

A guide to what's new in technology this Christmas season

SHARE: facebook Twitter icon Pinterest icon Linkedin icon Google+ icon Email icon |  PRINTER-FRIENDLY  |  COMMENTS
By Anick Jesdanun
Associated Press
Published:
  • People try out the new Samsung Galaxy Note II during a launch event Wednesday in New York. Aside from the 5.5-inch screen, the Note comes with a stylu...

    Associated Press

    People try out the new Samsung Galaxy Note II during a launch event Wednesday in New York. Aside from the 5.5-inch screen, the Note comes with a stylus and runs the latest version of Google's Android operating system.

  • Microsoft Corp.'s new Surface tablet computer, which went on sale Friday, starts at $499. The price matches that of Apple Inc.'s iPad, the most popula...

    Microsoft Corp.'s new Surface tablet computer, which went on sale Friday, starts at $499. The price matches that of Apple Inc.'s iPad, the most popular tablet computer, but the base model of the Surface has twice as much storage memory: 32 gigabytes. The screen is also slightly larger.

  • The iPad Mini has a screen that's about two-thirds the size of the full-size model. It costs $329 and up.

    The iPad Mini has a screen that's about two-thirds the size of the full-size model. It costs $329 and up.

Samsung Electronics Co. has been running ads touting its Galaxy S III phone as its "next big thing." Now it has something bigger.
The S III released a few months ago has a screen that measures 4.8 inches diagonally, making it bigger than even the iPhone 5, which is Apple's largest phone yet. This week, Samsung is releasing the Galaxy Note II, a smartphone with a 5.5 inch screen.
Aside from the larger screen, the Note comes with a stylus and runs the latest version of Google's Android operating system, Jelly Bean.
Samsung and Apple dominate with nearly half of the worldwide market for smartphones.
In recent months, Samsung's ads have been poking fun of Apple, suggesting that the iPhone 5 was merely playing catch-up with Samsung's products. However, a federal jury in California awarded Apple $1 billion in damages after finding that 26 Samsung products ripped off Apple's technology at the heart of its iPhones and iPads.
The Note's launch on Wednesday came a day after Apple unveiled a smaller iPad and a faster full-sized one. Apple also refreshed its line of Mac computers on Tuesday, while Microsoft on Thursday introduced Windows 8, a major update to its lucrative operating system.
These are some of the gadgets to expect for the holidays:
APPLE DEVICES
Apple has done well selling its full-sized tablet computer, which has a screen that measures nearly 10 inches diagonally. The iPad dominates the worldwide tablet market, accounting for 70 percent of all tablet shipments in the second quarter of this year, according to IHS iSuppli. But companies such as Amazon.com Inc. and Google Inc. have made in-roads selling tablets with smaller, 7-inch screens and lower price tags.
On Tuesday, Apple said it will start shipping the iPad Mini this week. It will have a 7.9-inch screen, making it slightly larger than those smaller rivals but about two-thirds the size of a regular iPad.
The iPad Mini starts at $329, well above the $159 starting price for Amazon.com Inc.'s Kindle Fire and $199 for Google Inc.'s Nexus 7. Both have 7-inch screens. The Mini will be just $70 cheaper than the 2011 iPad 2, which is still available.
Unlike its rivals, Apple will make a version of the iPad Mini that can access cellular networks from AT&T, Verizon and Sprint. That version will start at $459, compared with $629 for the full-sized cellular model.
Apple is also refreshing its full-sized iPad, giving it a faster processor and faster Wi-Fi capabilities. It will go on sale this week as well.
Meanwhile, Apple unveiled a 13-inch version of a MacBook Pro with sharper, "Retina" display, complementing the 15-inch version unveiled in June.
Apple also updated its iMac line. Some versions will sport a hybrid storage drive that combines the speed of flash memory and the capacity of regular hard drives. They will go on sale in December.
Last month, Apple began selling its iPhone 5. The new phone is bigger, but thinner than previous models and works with faster cellular networks known as 4G.
Apple's leading rival, Samsung Electronics Co., came out with a new version of its flagship phone, the Galaxy S III, months ago. But Samsung is known for releasing products throughout the year, each targeted at a different base of consumers. For those who like to work with a stylus, the Galaxy Note II smartphone is coming soon.
TABLET RIVALS
Amazon's 7-inch Kindle Fire is one of the smaller tablets with decent sales. Last month, it started shipping an updated version with a faster processor, more memory and longer battery life. It also cut the price to $159, from $199, making it far cheaper than the iPad, which starts at $399.
Amazon is also releasing higher-end models under the Kindle Fire HD line. A 7-inch one goes for $199 and an 8.9-inch one for $299. There's also a $499 model that can use the 4G cellular networks that phone companies have been building. A data plan will cost an extra $50 a year. The smaller HD model is already available, while the larger ones will be available Nov. 20.
Barnes and Noble Inc. is also updating its Nook tablets. The new Nook HD will come in two sizes, one at 7 inches (starting at $199) and one at 9 inches (starting at $269). They will be out Nov. 1.
In addition to the new HD screen and a lighter body, Barnes & Noble is increasing the services the Nook offers. It's adding a video purchase and rental service, allowing users to maintain different profiles and making it easier to browse titles in its book and magazine stores.
Google has an event in New York this week. All the company is saying is that it has to do with its Android operating system for mobile devices. Google started selling the Nexus 7 over the summer and could use the event to announce an update.
Toys R Us, meanwhile, is making a 7-inch tablet aimed at children. The Tabeo went on sale this week for $149.99.
CALLING ON WINDOWS
Microsoft Corp. released a new version of the Windows operating system on Friday, one that's designed to work on both traditional computers and tablet devices.
Several PC manufacturers including Lenovo Group Ltd., Hewlett-Packard Co., Samsung Electronics Co. and Dell Inc. already have announced details about new desktops, laptops and tablet computers.
Microsoft is making its own tablet computer, too. It's new territory for Microsoft, which typically leaves it to others to make devices using its software. Now, it is competing against its partners.
The Surface tablet comes in two versions, both with 10.6-inch screens, slightly larger than the iPad's.
One model runs on the same type of lower-energy chips used in the iPad. It will start at $499, also like the newest, full-sized iPads. A keyboard cover will cost another $100. That went on sale Friday.
A heavier, more expensive version will run on Intel chips and be capable of running standard Windows applications. Microsoft hasn't announced the date or price for that yet.
A new version of the Windows Phone system is coming out this fall as well. Once-dominant phone maker Nokia Corp. has been struggling in the shadow of Apple and Android, and it's counting on the new Windows system for a revival. Nokia and Microsoft have unveiled two new devices, but few details are available on when and where they would go on sale.
PLAYING GAMES
Nintendo's new Wii U game machine will go on sale in the U.S. on Nov. 18. A basic, white model will cost $300. A deluxe black version for another $50 comes with an extra game and more accessories. The GamePad touch-screen controller for it will offer new ways to play.
In "New Super Mario Bros. U.," for example, players holding the old Wii controllers control Mario, Luigi and other characters. The person with the GamePad can help them along by using a stylus to create stepping stones for the characters or stun enemies.
Players can also turn off the TV entirely and play on the GamePad.
Nintendo Co. has been trying to drum up excitement for the Wii U, the first major gaming console to launch since 2006.
The company also announced new entertainment features for the console. Called Nintendo TVii, the service collects all the ways users have to watch movies, TV shows and sports. This includes pay-TV accounts along with services such as Hulu and Netflix. The GamePad works as a fancy remote controller and will let viewers comment on what they are watching.
TVii will be available Nov. 18 as well, at no extra cost.

MORE HBJ HEADLINES

CALENDAR

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus

Market roundup