Story tags » Travel Life" /> Story tags » Travel">
The Herald of Everett, Washington
Customer service  |  Subscribe   |   Log in or sign up   |   Advertising information   |   Contact us
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up  Green editions icon Green editions

Fall is ideal accompaniment to Kalaloch on the coast

  • A couple walks on the beach at Kalaloch on a blustery fall day.

    Kalaloch Lodge

    A couple walks on the beach at Kalaloch on a blustery fall day.

  • Ruby Beach at Kalaloch. There's plenty to see in the Kalaloch area, whether it's a romantic getaway or a family excursion you're looking for.

    Kalaloch Lodge

    Ruby Beach at Kalaloch. There's plenty to see in the Kalaloch area, whether it's a romantic getaway or a family excursion you're looking for.

SHARE: facebook Twitter icon Pinterest icon Linkedin icon Google+ icon Email icon |  PRINTER-FRIENDLY  |  COMMENTS
By Jeffrey P. Mayor
The News Tribune
Published:
  • A couple walks on the beach at Kalaloch on a blustery fall day.

    Kalaloch Lodge

    A couple walks on the beach at Kalaloch on a blustery fall day.

  • Ruby Beach at Kalaloch. There's plenty to see in the Kalaloch area, whether it's a romantic getaway or a family excursion you're looking for.

    Kalaloch Lodge

    Ruby Beach at Kalaloch. There's plenty to see in the Kalaloch area, whether it's a romantic getaway or a family excursion you're looking for.

Take off for the Washington coast. Fall's a better time to take the drive than you might think. You can indulge in a romantic getaway with walks on solitary beaches, dinners before the fire and windswept vistas, or take the family to romp on the sand and watch for a far-off whale spout. If you use the Kalaloch area as your base, there are plenty of things to see and do this time of year.
"During October and November, gray whales begin their migration south," said Judy Lively, an Olympic coast interpreter at Olympic National Park. "The park's coastal areas are right along their path."
The best place to whale-watch is from the beaches and high ocean overlooks along U.S. 101: Destruction Island Overlook, Beach 6, Kalaloch Lodge and South Beach.
Lively recommends bringing binoculars since the whales are farther out than when they migrate north in the spring.
If the whales are not cooperating, you can admire the Big Cedar Tree, walk the Kalaloch Creek Nature Trail or play at Ruby Beach.
Look for the 174-foot-tall Big Cedar (hard to miss) just off 101 near Beach 6. The original western red cedar, which has been dead for many years, is being used as a standing nurse log for hundreds of trees and plants.
The hollow base is roomy enough for several people to stand in it. Photo op!
A groomed trail with boardwalks, the Kalaloch Creek trail is a 1 1/2-mile loop with 200 feet of elevation gain. You might see some elk as they escape upper-elevation snow.
Ruby Beach is a great place to play -- when the weather is good -- and to watch the power of nature as storms roll in.
Both Kalaloch and Mora campgrounds are first-come, first-served this time of year.
Kalaloch Lodge offers hotel rooms and cabins, and a nice place to eat, Creekside Restaurant, which has a view and is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
For more information, see nps.gov/olym and thekalalochlodge.com.
Story tags » Travel

More Life Headlines

NEWSLETTER

Weekend to-do list

Our to-do list full of ideas for your weekend

Calendar

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus