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Published: Wednesday, November 14, 2012, 12:01 a.m.

Try a cider brine for a more flavorful turkey

  • This turkey uses a cider brine to boost the flavor and moisture of the turkey. The savory and subtly sweet flavor goes great with the traditional side...

    Matthew Mead / Associated Press

    This turkey uses a cider brine to boost the flavor and moisture of the turkey. The savory and subtly sweet flavor goes great with the traditional sides. Sage gravy tops it all off.

  • In this image taken on Oct. 8, 2012, sage gravy is shown in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

    In this image taken on Oct. 8, 2012, sage gravy is shown in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

If you are going to go to the (admittedly little) trouble of brining your Thanksgiving turkey, be sure to set the bar higher than simply adding moisture. This also is a great opportunity to add plenty of flavor.
The flavor of this brine ends up being at once subtly sweet, but also boldly savory. And that is a combination that makes the meat a perfect partner for all the classic Thanksgiving sides.
Cider-brined turkey and sage gravy
For the turkey:
1 12- to 14-pound turkey
1/2 gallon apple cider
1/2 cup kosher salt
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup minced fresh sage
1 tablespoon crushed black peppercorns
For the gravy:
1/4 cup white wine
2 cups low-sodium chicken or turkey broth
3 tablespoons instant flour, such as Wondra
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage
Salt and ground black pepper
Place a 2 1/2-gallon zip-close plastic bag upright in a large bowl. Place the turkey in the bowl, then pour in the cider, salt, brown sugar, sage and peppercorns. Seal the bag, squeezing out the air. Massage the bag to mix the ingredients. Refrigerate and let brine work for a minimum of 8 hours, turning the turkey now and again.
When ready to roast, heat the oven to 350 F. Fit a roasting pan with a rack.
Remove the turkey from the brine and discard the brine. Pat the turkey dry, then set it onto the roasting rack. Roast for 2 to 2 1/2 hours, or until the temperature of the breast reaches 160 degrees and the thighs reach 170 degrees. If the turkey darkens too much, cover it loosely with foil.
Transfer the turkey to a serving platter, wrap with foil, then set a couple layer of bath towels over it to keep it warm.
Remove the rack from the roasting pan. Place the roasting pan over medium heat on the stovetop (you may need two burners) and bring the juices to a simmer. Add the wine and scrape up any browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Pour the broth into the pan, whisking continuously. Add the flour and whisk to combine. Simmer for 5 minutes, while continuing to stir. Season with sage, salt and black pepper.
Story tags » CookingThanksgiving

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