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Published: Sunday, January 6, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Mountain-climbing judge's biggest molehill: Fighting cancer

  • Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Marybeth Dingledy was appointed to the bench in January 2012.

    Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Marybeth Dingledy was appointed to the bench in January 2012.

  • Marybeth Dingledy in 2009 in Tanzania, where she traveled to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.

    Courtesy of Marybeth Dingledy

    Marybeth Dingledy in 2009 in Tanzania, where she traveled to climb Mount Kilimanjaro.

  • Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Marybeth Dingledy (right) with another climber at the summit of Mount Rainier during a climb last summer.

    Courtesy of Marybeth Dingledy

    Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Marybeth Dingledy (right) with another climber at the summit of Mount Rainier during a climb last summer.

  • Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Marybeth Dingledy climbs to a high camp on the second day of her trip last summer to summit Mount Rainier. Dingl...

    Courtesy of Marybeth Dingledy

    Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Marybeth Dingledy climbs to a high camp on the second day of her trip last summer to summit Mount Rainier. Dingledy has made many treks with the Climb to Fight Breast Cancer, which benefits Seattle's Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Put one foot in front of the other. For Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Marybeth Dingledy, that old advice for facing adversity isn't nearly enough.
She steps it up -- way up.
On Wednesday, the 43-year-old was officially back at work, but not from a fun-filled Christmas vacation. Dingledy, appointed to the bench a year ago, was recovering from a double mastectomy. She had surgery Dec. 5.
With her intrepid spirit, she plans to celebrate her recovery by climbing Alaska's Denali, the highest peak in North America. Her recent surgery wasn't the first time Dingledy coped with a health challenge. And the Denali climb in June won't be the first time she'll turn trouble into triumph.
"I didn't panic about it," Dingledy said Wednesday about the mastectomy. "I knew the potential was there. I had a lot of time to prepare."
It was 2009, before her trek that summer up Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro, that Dingledy first was interviewed for this column. Then an attorney with the Snohomish County Public Defender Association, she told how in 2003 she learned she had inherited an altered BRCA2 gene.
People with a mutated BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, according to the National Cancer Institute, have a much higher than normal risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer.
In a great leap beyond the specter of her genetics, Dingledy decided to climb mountains. She summited Mount Baker in 2006 in her first trek with the Climb to Fight Breast Cancer, a fundraiser for Seattle's Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.
She has since climbed Mount Olympus in Olympic National Park, Mount Kilimanjaro, Iztaccihuatl and Pico de Orizaba in Mexico, and has twice summited Mount Rainier. She also climbed Mount Shasta, but didn't reach the top.
In October 2011, Dingledy took a serious step to improve her chances of dodging cancer. On the advice of doctors at Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, she had a preventative hysterectomy, which is removal of the uterus, and had her ovaries removed. That reduced her risk for both ovarian and breast cancer.
And yet, this past July 30 she learned she had a noninvasive type of breast cancer, ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS. Dingledy reacted to that bad news as she has in the past, putting one foot in front of the other in big ways.
The weekend after finding out she had breast cancer, Dingledy took a two-week backpacking trip. In September, before the mastectomy, she and a friend walked 60 miles in Seattle's Susan G. Komen 3-Day walk. At the end of that breast-cancer research fundraiser, Dingledy wore a pink shirt at the closing ceremony. "A pink shirt is for survivors," she said.
She threw herself a party the weekend before she lost her breasts, which she jokingly called "the twins."
When she showed up for her mastectomy in Seattle, she wore a tiara and a pink boa. Within a week, she was up and busy. "When I got on the exercise bike in the basement, everybody yelled at me. I can't sit still," she said.
She doesn't need radiation or chemotherapy. Her focus now is on 20,320-foot Denali, also called Mount McKinley.
Dingledy shares her story on the Climb to Fight Breast Cancer ">website, but as a judge it's not appropriate for her to be involved in fundraising. "I can't ask for a donation," she said last week. Anyone who wants to can donate.
Lisa Carlson, event manager with the Climb to Fight Breast Cancer, said Friday that since Dingledy began climbing her efforts have raised almost $75,000 for cancer research. In more than 15 years, Carlson said, the climbs have raised $6.6 million for the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Last year, she said, 121 people participated in the fundraising climbs.
Carlson and Dingledy have become good friends, and have hiked and climbed together. "I've been particularly in awe of how willing she is to share her story," Carlson said. "She's never going to be a victim of anything. It doesn't matter what life throws at her, her glass remains half full."
Climb participants choose from 13 mountains, Carlson said. "Denali is for a serious mountaineer. This was her biggest health challenge, and she picked the biggest mountain we have," Carlson said.
Last year was also Dingledy's first in a challenging new job.
"I'm learning every day," the new judge said. "It's kind of like going back to law school. The bench here is fantastic. It's a collegial environment, with very smart judges and good people."
Her new colleagues have been kind and understanding about her health ordeal, she said.
"Lots of people get breast cancer. You can make it ruin your life or make it a source of inspiration," Dingledy said. "When I first found out I had the gene, it was a letdown. But it changed the direction of my life. It motivated me."
Since last month's surgery, Dingledy has been to her first yoga class. She wore a T-shirt that said "Cancer messed with the wrong girl."
Julie Muhlstein: 425-339-3460; muhlstein@heraldnet.com.
Learn more
For more information about the Climb to Fight Breast Cancer, which benefits Seattle's Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center: www.fhcrc.org/climb
To read more about Marybeth Dingledy's planned Denali climb:
http://tinyurl.com/MDDenaliClimb


Story tags » JudiciaryDiseasesCharityMountain Climbing

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