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Published: Monday, January 7, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Cities, groups to be honored for river, Puget Sound stewardship

  • Ray Jenston, of Arlington, walks his dog, Rockport, across the foot bridge in Old Town Wetland Park on Saturday.

    Ray Jenston, of Arlington, walks his dog, Rockport, across the foot bridge in Old Town Wetland Park on Saturday.

  • A foot bridge is reflected in a small pond in the Old Town Wetland Park in Arlington. The cities of Everett and Arlington will be honored for creating...

    Genna Martin / The Herald

    A foot bridge is reflected in a small pond in the Old Town Wetland Park in Arlington. The cities of Everett and Arlington will be honored for creating several parks, such the Old Town Wetland that helps to improve the environment and filter storm water before it enters the Stillaguamish River.

  • Genna Martin/The Herald
Ray Jenston, of Arlington, walks his dog, Rockport, on the trails at the Old Town Wetland Park on Saturday. The cities of Ever...

    Genna Martin/The Herald Ray Jenston, of Arlington, walks his dog, Rockport, on the trails at the Old Town Wetland Park on Saturday. The cities of Everett and Arlington will be awarded for creating several parks, including the Old Town Wetland, that help to improve the environment and filter storm water before it enters the Stillaguamish River.

  • Genna Martin/The Herald
Steve Swanson, of Arlington, walks his dog, Zoe, on the trails at the Old Town Wetland Park on Saturday. The cities of Everett...

    Genna Martin/The Herald Steve Swanson, of Arlington, walks his dog, Zoe, on the trails at the Old Town Wetland Park on Saturday. The cities of Everett and Arlington will be awarded for creating several parks, including the Old Town Wetland, that help to improve the environment and filter storm water before it enters the Stillaguamish River.

  • Genna Martin/The Herald
Ray Jenston, of Arlington, walks his dog, Rockport, on the trails at the Old Town Wetland Park on Saturday. The cities of Ever...

    Genna Martin/The Herald Ray Jenston, of Arlington, walks his dog, Rockport, on the trails at the Old Town Wetland Park on Saturday. The cities of Everett and Arlington will be awarded for creating several parks, including the Old Town Wetland, that help to improve the environment and filter storm water before it enters the Stillaguamish River.

The cities of Everett and Arlington will be honored for their efforts at helping clean up -- and keep clean -- water that flows into Puget Sound.
The Snohomish County Marine Resources Committee and the Nature Conservancy also will be recognized for their work on Port Susan and the Port Susan Marine Stewardship Area.
The Puget Sound Partnership, a state agency charged with leading efforts to help reduce pollution in Puget Sound, is to present its Champion Awards from 12:10 to 12:50 p.m. Monday to a wide group of cities, organizations and agencies working on the watersheds of the Snohomish and Stillaguamish rivers.
The ceremony is taking place at the Snohomish County Campus, Drewel Building, Rockefeller Avenue, Everett.
The city of Everett is being recognized for its construction of seven rain gardens on private properties in north Everett. The gardens, designed with soil and plants aimed at soaking up rain water, serve the dual purpose of preventing water from backing up into homeowners' basements and also stopping polluted water from washing into storm drains, said Marla Carter, with the city's Public Works Department.
The gardens cost about $6,000 apiece. The city worked with the Snohomish Conservation District and Washington State University Snohomish County Extension on the project.
Arlington is being recognized for creating the Old Town Wetland Project, a 9-acre park that's a man-made wetlands to provide shade to cool its water, which comes from the storm drains on 270 acres in downtown Arlington.
The Nature Conservancy is being recognized for habitat restoration for the Port Susan Bay Restoration Project. Snohomish County Marine Resources Committee is being recognized for habitat protection for work on the Port Susan Marine Stewardship Area.
Other organizations to be awarded include:
King County and the city of Seattle, to be recognized for habitat restoration for the Tolt River Floodplain Reconnection Project;
Puget Soundkeeper Alliance, to be recognized for engaging the public with its Pollution Prevention Program;
Kit Rawson, to be recognized for individual achievements to protect and restore salmon runs and Puget Sound.
Puget Sound Champion awards are presented by the Leadership Council to honor partner contributions to the Puget Sound ecosystem recovery effort.
To learn about other Puget Sound Champions, go to www.psp.wa.gov/champions.php



Story tags » Environmental IssuesAwards and Prizes

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