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EHS sports

'No excuses' a fine lesson to learn

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In response to the Thursday letter to the editor "Suspensions exceed the crime," I want to say "time-out." As an Everett High alum myself, it's gratifying seeing the school athletics perform well and I follow them regularly. And as once an athlete, I remember the same rules that I too had to sign allegiance.
Although it saddens me to see both basketball programs suffer, the silver lining just may be that some learn the value that seems gradually fleeting our younger society these days -- responsibility. Don't get me wrong, I remember what it was like in school, and the parties too. But if you're in line for a scholarship for your athletic talents, you have no place at these events pure and simple.
The lesson here is about responsibilities and commitments broken. As these young people go into adulthood they will remember this time on the bench and why they sit. Hopefully a lesson that carries forward, helping build their character. It's unfortunate if the suspension is the difference in a scholarship or not. I would hope their academics would overcome that.
Blaming the athletic department for what is morally obligatory for our youth is absurd. The rules were clearly stated and signed. And I applaud the fact that our school staff is taking the hard line in an unfortunate, difficult situation.
Character trait 101 I revere most in my professional career is that of those who own their mistakes instead of making excuses or casting blame. It makes the difference between good people and great people, those you do business with and those you don't. Failure is a teacher. Reap what you sow. Follow through with your commitments. If you're wrong -- be a champion, own it and move forward with integrity.
Darren Armstrong

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