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Published: Thursday, January 24, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

1940s mechanics would have loved a laser pointer

Flying Heritage Collection staffers rolled the B-25J Mitchell outside on a foggy morning to take some fuel out of its tanks. While out of the hangar, mechanics took advantage of the open space and dreary weather to harmonize the bomber's .50 caliber guns. Sitting in the cockpit and looking through the gunsight, they affixed an X made out of tape to the side of the hangar as an aim point. Then, one by one, the guns were adjusted to hit this target. The FHC had an advantage that the crews in the 1940s didn't have; a laser pointer. The glowing pinpoint was easy to see in the morning mist.

Story tags » Military aviationGeneral Aviation

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