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Published: Thursday, January 31, 2013, 9:32 p.m.

Super Bowl ads: You make the call

With the millions that advertisers spend on Super Bowl ads, companies are doing what they can to involve consumers and get them to do more than just watch.

  • This undated screenshot provided by PepsiCo shows the Super Bowl advertisement for PepsiCo's Frito-Lay's Doritos. PepsiCo's"Crash the Super Bowl&...

    Associated Press

    This undated screenshot provided by PepsiCo shows the Super Bowl advertisement for PepsiCo's Frito-Lay's Doritos. PepsiCo's"Crash the Super Bowl" ads are back for the seventh straight year. Two 30-second commercials made by consumers will make it on the air. Fans voted for one winner and Doritos chose the other.

  • A scene from Coca Cola's Super Bowl ad.

    Associated Press

    A scene from Coca Cola's Super Bowl ad.

  • This screenshot provided by Paramount Farms shows Psy filming the Super Bowl advertisement for first-time advertiser Paramount Farms' Wonderful Pistac...

    Associated Press

    This screenshot provided by Paramount Farms shows Psy filming the Super Bowl advertisement for first-time advertiser Paramount Farms' Wonderful Pistachios brand of nut. The 30-second ad in the third quarter presents the company's "Get Crackin'" campaign that stars the Korean pop sensation Psy.

  • This screen shot provided by Hyundai shows the Super Bowl advertisement by Hyundai Motor Group's Kia. In the advertisment, Kia invents a fanciful way ...

    Associated Press

    This screen shot provided by Hyundai shows the Super Bowl advertisement by Hyundai Motor Group's Kia. In the advertisment, Kia invents a fanciful way that babies are made, blasting in from a baby planet in its "Space babies" ad for the 2014 Sorento crossover.

  • Associated Press
This undated screenshot provided by the Milk Processor Education Program, known as MilkPep shows the company's Super Bowl advertiseme...

    Associated Press This undated screenshot provided by the Milk Processor Education Program, known as MilkPep shows the company's Super Bowl advertisement. The Milk Processor Education Program, known as MilkPep and popular for its "Got Milk?" print ads, is featuring actor and professional wrestler Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson in a 30-second ad in the second quarter that is directed by Peter Berg.

NEW YORK -- You don't have to be a football player to be a part of the action on Super Bowl Sunday.
Coca-Cola is asking people to vote for an online match between three groups competing in a desert for a Coke on Game Day. Pepsi and Toyota are using viewers' photos in their ads. Audi let people choose the end of its Super Bowl ad, while Lincoln based its spot on more 6,000 tweets from fans about their road trips.
These are just some ways advertisers have found to get viewers involved in the excitement on Game Day by luring them online. And they're going well beyond encouraging fans to tweet or "like" their ads on websites like Twitter Facebook.
They're trying to get the most of their Super Bowl ads, which cost nearly $4 million for a 30-second spot, by drawing people online. Companies that advertise during the Super Bowl get a 20 percent increase in Web traffic on the day of the game, according to the analytics arm of software maker Adobe. They also have a higher online audience than average in the week after.
"We're seeing better and more unique ways of getting people involved," said Robert Kolt, an advertising instructor at Michigan State University. "You want people to be engaged."
PepsiCo, which is sponsoring the Super Bowl halftime show, said its goal was to create buzz online with a monthlong campaign that went well beyond a voice-over saying "brought to you by Pepsi."
For about two weeks, Pepsi asked fans online and via a digital billboard in New York's Times Square to submit their photos for a chance to appear in a 30-second "intro" spot to air right before the halftime show.
The company said the effort was more popular than it expected: Pepsi expected to get 2,000 photos, but got 100,000 instead. About 1,000 photos were chosen to be a part of the intro. They will be stitched together in a "flipbook" style video that appears to show one person jumping to the tune of "Countdown," a song by Beyoncé, who is performing during the halftime show.
"We don't just want (viewers) on pepsi.com, we want them telling their friends 'I just did something with Pepsi," said Angelique Krembs, vice president of trademark Pepsi marketing. "You want the friend to tell the friend about Pepsi. You don't want Pepsi to always be the one talking about Pepsi."
Ford Motor Co.'s Lincoln enlisted Jimmy Fallon, host of NBC's "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon," to sift through thousands of tweets submitted by fans about road trips for its Super Bowl spot.
The story line for the 30-second ad, which was developed from 6,117 tweets, features rapper Joseph "Rev Run" Simmons and Wil Wheaton, who acted in the iconic science-fiction series "Star Trek: The Next Generation."
"We drove passed an alpaca farm, a few of them were meandering on the highway and my sister screamed, "It's the Alpacalypse!," reads one tweet.
"Drove through a movie set in Palmdale, Calif., and didn't realize it. Got out and enjoyed the catered food," reads another tweet.
Coca-Cola created an online game that pits a troupe of showgirls, biker-style "badlanders" and cowboys against each other in a race to find a Coke in the desert. Viewers are encouraged to vote for their favorite group and set up obstacles that delay other groups on CokeChase.com. Obstacles include a traffic light or getting a pizza delivered, which waste time.
The game is alluded to in a Super Bowl ad and the winning group -- which has the most "for" votes and the least "obstacle" votes will be announced after the game. Coke will also give the first 50,000 people who vote a free Coke. The campaign is more interactive than Coca-Cola's online effort last year, which featured a real-time animation of Polar Bears reacting to what was happening during the Super Bowl.
"Last year's effort was much more passive. It was you watching bears watching the game," said Pio Schunker, senior vice president of integrated marketing. "This year we thought, 'Can we up ante on the fun factor by handing the reins over to consumers?'"
Audi let viewers choose one of three possible endings for its Game Day spot by voting online on Jan. 25 for 24 hours.
The ad shows a boy who gets enough confidence from driving his father's Audi to the prom to kiss his dream girl, even though he is then decked by her boyfriend. Audi allowed people to vote for one of three potential endings for the ad.
In one possible ending, the boy drives home alone in triumph. Another ending shows him palling around with friends. The third shows the boy going home and finding a prom picture of his parents in which his dad has a similar black eye.
The first ending, called "Worth it," won.
Audi, which declined to say how many people voted, said "Worth It," was by far the most popular, getting more than half of the total views and the most "thumbs up" out of all three versions
"This year, Audi wanted to elevate fan interaction by allowing them to take part in the creative process and have a voice in how our spot should end," said Loren Angelo, Audi's general manager of brand marketing. "
The strategy seems to be working. On YouTube, the Audi ad is the third-most viewed Super Bowl ad so far, with 2.5 million views, behind a Toyota ad staring Kaley Cuoco of CBS' "The Big Bang Theory" and a teaser for Mercedes-Benz featuring supermodel Kate Upton, according to YouTube.com
----------------
Get in the game
Coca-Cola "Coke Chase" campaign: www.cokechase.com
Pepsi's "Halftime" campaign: http://halftime.pepsi.com/
Toyota's "Wish Granted" ad: tinyurl.com/ToyotaSBAd
Ford's Lincoln "Steer the Script" campaign: http://www.steerthescript.com/
Audi's "Prom" ad: tinyurl.com/SBAudiAd



Story tags » TelevisionMediaSuper Bowl

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