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Published: Thursday, January 31, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Plant of Merit: Wintergreen

WHAT: Gaultheria procumbens, commonly known as wintergreen, is a plant that has it all: lustrous evergreen leaves, flowers and berries.
During the late spring, blush colored flowers emerge and bloom through the summer, followed by bright red berry clusters.
Birds are attracted to wintergreen, which is native to North America south to Alabama.
SUN OR SHADE: This shrub is native to woodland settings so needs full to part shade.
SIZE: Wintergreen can be used as a ground cover or a low growing shrub as its maximum height is 6 to 12 inches.
SEE IT: At the Evergreen Arboretum & Gardens, 145 Alverson Blvd., Everett; in the Shade Garden. For more information, see the virtual photo tour on www.evergreenarboretum.com or call 425-257-8597.
Source: Sandra Schumacher/ Evergreen Arboretum & Gardens Foundation
Story tags » Gardening

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