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Published: Friday, February 1, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Photos of woodpeckers, owls exhibited at Edmonds museum

Photos of the lives of woodpeckers, owls are featured at Edmonds museum

  • A northern pygmy owl peers out of nest cavity created by a hairy woodpecker in a quaking aspen tree in the Cascades. The photo is part of an exhibit c...

    Paul Bannick

    A northern pygmy owl peers out of nest cavity created by a hairy woodpecker in a quaking aspen tree in the Cascades. The photo is part of an exhibit called "The Owl & the Woodpecker in Washington" by photographer Paul Bannick. The exhibit is scheduled to be on display from Saturday through April 14 at the Edmonds Historical Museum.

EDMONDS -- A new photographic exhibit exploring the intertwined lives of owls and woodpeckers is scheduled to open this weekend at Edmonds Historical Museum.
The exhibit called "The Owl & the Woodpecker in Washington" by photographer Paul Bannick is part of a traveling show created by the Burke Museum in Seattle. The exhibit is scheduled to be shown in Edmonds through April 14.
The exhibit also features local information provided by the Edmonds Community Backyard Wildlife Habitat Project and the National Wildlife Federation.
Based on Bannick's book, "The Owl and the Woodpecker," the exhibit features 15 photographic prints of owl and woodpecker species found in the Pacific Northwest, together with text panels and vivid birdcalls and drumming sound recordings by audio-naturalist Martyn Stewart.
Bannick, 48, who lives in Seattle, worked for 15 years in the computer software industry beginning at the Aldus Corp. and then later serving as a director for Adobe Systems, and a senior manager at Microsoft.
Bannick currently serves as the director of development for Conservation Northwest, an organization dedicated to protecting and connecting wild areas from the Pacific Coast to the Canadian Rockies.
Edmonds Historical Museum at 118 Fifth Ave. N. in downtown Edmonds is open Wednesday through Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Suggested donation is $5 per adult and $2 per child. For more information, go to historicedmonds.org.
Story tags » PhotographyBooksWildlife HabitatBird-watching

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