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Goal of screening: Prevent tragedies

  • Snohomish High Schoot students Allison Hoeth and Tim Coombs practice CPR and use of an automated defibrillator during a program Nov. 7 at the school, ...

    Michael O'Leary / The Herald

    Snohomish High Schoot students Allison Hoeth and Tim Coombs practice CPR and use of an automated defibrillator during a program Nov. 7 at the school, which was put on by the Nick of Time Foundation.

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Herald staff
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  • Snohomish High Schoot students Allison Hoeth and Tim Coombs practice CPR and use of an automated defibrillator during a program Nov. 7 at the school, ...

    Michael O'Leary / The Herald

    Snohomish High Schoot students Allison Hoeth and Tim Coombs practice CPR and use of an automated defibrillator during a program Nov. 7 at the school, which was put on by the Nick of Time Foundation.

EDMONDS -- More than 500 students in the Edmonds School District are expected to be screened Wednesday for possible undetected heart conditions which might increase their risk of sudden cardiac arrest, a leading cause of death for young athletes.
The nonprofit Nick of Time Foundation is working with partners UW Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, Snohomish County Fire District 1 and other community groups to provide the testing.
The screening is to take place at the Edmonds-Woodway High School gymnasium.
About one seemingly healthy young person suffers sudden cardiac arrest every three days in the U.S. One was Nicholas Varrenti, who died at the age of 16 in 2004 of sudden cardiac arrest after a busy weekend playing football.
His mom, Darla Varrenti, started the foundation and serves as the executive director.
The Nick of Time Foundation has held other screenings in Arlington and Snohomish. These free events are made possible due to the volunteer efforts of numerous community organizations.
The foundation also seeks to have automated external defibrillators installed at all schools.
Story tags » EdmondsEducation & SchoolsHealth treatment

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