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Published: Sunday, February 10, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Faucet extender makes it easier for kids to use the sink

  • Aqueduck

Aqueduck Products make it easier for children to use the bathroom sink without help from Mom or Dad. The company makes a faucet extender that funnels water forward in the sink so little hands can reach the water. Its handle extender attaches to a handle of a double-handle faucet to enable kids to turn it.
For safety reasons, the handle extender is recommended for use only on the cold-water side.
The faucet extender comes in five colors and sells for $12.99 at www.peachyco.com. The handle extender is $19.99. Shipping is extra.
McClatchy Tribune Services
Story tags » Home Improvement

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