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Today in history

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Published:
Today is Tuesday, Feb. 19, the 50th day of 2013. There are 315 days left in the year.
Today's highlight:
On Feb. 19, 1963, the book "The Feminine Mystique" by Betty Friedan, credited with reviving American feminism, was first published by W.W. Norton & Co.
On this date:
In 1473, astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus was born in Torun, Poland.
In 1803, Congress voted to accept Ohio's borders and constitution.
In 1807, former Vice President Aaron Burr, accused of treason, was arrested in the Mississippi Territory, in present-day Alabama. (Burr was acquitted at trial.)
In 1846, the Texas state government was formally installed in Austin, with J. Pinckney Henderson taking the oath of office as governor.
In 1878, Thomas Edison received a U.S. patent for "an improvement in phonograph or speaking machines."
In 1881, Kansas prohibited the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages.
In 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which cleared the way for the U.S. military to relocate and intern Japanese-Americans. Japanese warplanes raided the Australian city of Darwin; at least 243 people were killed.
In 1945, during World War II, some 30,000 U.S. Marines began landing on Iwo Jima, where they began a successful month-long battle to seize control of the island from Japanese forces.
In 1986, the U.S. Senate approved an international treaty outlawing genocide, 83-11, nearly 37 years after the pact had first been submitted for ratification.
In 1997, Deng Xiaoping, the last of China's major Communist revolutionaries, died at age 92.
Five years ago: An ailing Fidel Castro resigned the Cuban presidency after nearly a half-century in power; his brother Raul was later named to succeed him.
One year ago: Three skiers were killed when an avalanche swept them about a quarter-mile down an out-of-bounds canyon at Stevens Pass, Wash., but a fourth skier caught up in the slide was saved by a safety device.
Associated Press
Story tags » History

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