The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions

Calendar


HeraldNet Headlines
HeraldNet Newsletter Delivered to your inbox each week.
Published: Saturday, March 9, 2013, 2:24 p.m.

Young tree left at tiny Portland park where 1 was stolen

  • Traffic moves past Mills End Park, the world's smallest park, where a new tree was planted to replace the one stolen last week, Thursday, March 7, 201...

    Traffic moves past Mills End Park, the world's smallest park, where a new tree was planted to replace the one stolen last week, Thursday, March 7, 2013 in Portland, Ore. The Douglas Fir was planted Wednesday to replace the lone tree that someone stole last week. The 2-foot-diameter park, which lies in a median strip in downtown Portland near the Willamette River, was established by newspaper columnist Dick Fagan in the 1940s and became an official city park in 1976. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)

PORTLAND -- Was it remorse -- or a tiny tree fairy? Portland parks officials say a Douglas Fir sapling resembling one stolen from a tiny Portland park has appeared at the 2-foot-diameter oasis.
Last week's theft captured the city's attention. On Wednesday, park staffers planted a replacement sapling to fill the hole left in the center of the park.
Parks officials say a passing driver posted a comment online Friday, noting that a young tree, roots and all, was lying on its side beside the replacement tree. The unidentified driver speculated that perhaps the "arborious criminal was feeling remorse."
Parks Director Mike Abbate says if the latest tree is healthy, it will be planted in another city park.
Even if the thief returned the tree, Sgt. Pete Simpson says police will continue their investigation. In his words, "Remorse does not mean 'case closed.'"
The tiny park lies in a median strip in downtown Portland near the Willamette River. It was established by newspaper columnist Dick Fagan in the 1940s and became an official city park in 1976.

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus
digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

HeraldNet highlights

'The Pinterest of beer'
'The Pinterest of beer': Lynnwood man's iPhone app tracks the beers you drink
Your photos
Your photos: A selection of our favorite reader-submitted photos
Tulips in bloom
Tulips in bloom: Photo gallery: A rainbow of color in Skagit County
He was a devoted family man
He was a devoted family man: Stephen Neal was working in a home when the mudslide hit