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Published: Monday, March 11, 2013, 2:44 p.m.

Mitch Seavey leading Iditarod, about 200 miles left

  • Ray Redington, Jr., gives his dogs straw to bed down in Unalakleet on Sunday, March 10, 2013, during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. (AP Photo/Ancho...

    Ray Redington, Jr., gives his dogs straw to bed down in Unalakleet on Sunday, March 10, 2013, during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. (AP Photo/Anchorage Daily News, Bill Roth)

  • Aliy Zirkle poles on her way into Unalakleet on Sunday, March 10, 2013, during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. (AP Photo/Anchorage Daily News, Bill ...

    Aliy Zirkle poles on her way into Unalakleet on Sunday, March 10, 2013, during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. (AP Photo/Anchorage Daily News, Bill Roth)

  • Volunteers hang a banner above the burled arch, which serves as the finish line for the 1,000-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska, on Mo...

    Volunteers hang a banner above the burled arch, which serves as the finish line for the 1,000-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska, on Monday, March 11, 2013. The race began March 3 in Willow, Alaska, and some race watchers predict a Tuesday finish. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen)

SHAKTOOLIK, Alaska -- Former champion Mitch Seavey is maintaining his lead in Alaska's Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race.
The 2004 champion left the checkpoint at Shaktoolik at 1:15 a.m. Monday after resting his team for nearly four hours.
However, Aaron Burmeister was not going to allow Seavey to get much of a lead. He followed Seavey out less than an hour later. And, four-time champion Jeff King is in fourth place, just three minutes behind Burmeister.
The finish in Nome now is just a little more than 200 miles away. From Shaktoolik, teams travel across the frozen sea ice and toward Koyuk. This section of trail can be dicey, especially if a blizzard kicks up. Coastal storms have ended more than one musher's dream of arriving first to Nome.

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