Snohomish County Career Fair - September 10
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Chinook canoe trip celebrates lower Columbia

  • Two canoes, one from the Snohomish tribe and one from the Chinook Indian Nation, head downstream on the Columbia River from Kalama on Tuesday. The gro...

    Roger Werth / The Longview Daily News

    Two canoes, one from the Snohomish tribe and one from the Chinook Indian Nation, head downstream on the Columbia River from Kalama on Tuesday. The group of 31 canoers set off on the second annual Ancestral Canoe Journey of the Chinook, which celebrates the river and tribal traditions.

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Associated Press
Published:
  • Two canoes, one from the Snohomish tribe and one from the Chinook Indian Nation, head downstream on the Columbia River from Kalama on Tuesday. The gro...

    Roger Werth / The Longview Daily News

    Two canoes, one from the Snohomish tribe and one from the Chinook Indian Nation, head downstream on the Columbia River from Kalama on Tuesday. The group of 31 canoers set off on the second annual Ancestral Canoe Journey of the Chinook, which celebrates the river and tribal traditions.

LONGVIEW -- Members of the Chinook Indian Nation and friends plan to finish a five-day paddle down the lower Columbia River in traditional canoes on Friday at the mouth of the river.
The Daily News reports the trip started in the Washougal area and will end with a private salmon ceremony at Chinook Point at Fort Columbia State Park.
The annual canoe event celebrates the river and tribal traditions.
The Chinook Nation consists of Cathlamet, Clatsop, Lower Chinook, Wahkiakum and Willapa tribes. The Chinooks were not recognized by the federal government as a tribe because they did not move east of the Cascades in the 1800s. They are still seeking federal recognition.

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