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Herald staff | rking@heraldnet.com
Published: Thursday, June 20, 2013, 9:45 a.m.

Sheriff's helicopter team tests new alarms

  • The sheriff's helicopter rescue team on Wednesday tested emergency alarms from a device mounted in the back of SnoHawk10.

    Snohomish County Sheriff's Office

    The sheriff's helicopter rescue team on Wednesday tested emergency alarms from a device mounted in the back of SnoHawk10.

  • The sheriff’s helicopter rescue team on Wednesday tested emergency alarms from a device mounted in the back of SnoHawk10.

    Snohomish County Sheriff's Office

    The sheriff’s helicopter rescue team on Wednesday tested emergency alarms from a device mounted in the back of SnoHawk10.

  • The sheriff’s helicopter rescue team on Wednesday tested emergency alarms from a device mounted in the back of SnoHawk10.

    Snohomish County Sheriff's Office

    The sheriff’s helicopter rescue team on Wednesday tested emergency alarms from a device mounted in the back of SnoHawk10.

Did you hear the emergency alarm tests in Snohomish County on Wednesday afternoon and evening?

Did you know they were being broadcast from a piece of equipment mounted in the sheriff's rescue helicopter, SnoHawk10?

The helicopter team shared some pictures today from the mission.

They conducted a few tests in locations including downtown Everett, Snohomish and the Verlot Ranger Station to get the sound level right and reduce feedback, sheriff's chief pilot Bill Quistorf said Thursday.

They also flew over the Getchell Fire Station, where Fire Chief Travis Hots told them the alarms sounded good from there.

The tests were successful at most altitudes, though trees can block the sound, Quistorf said.

The system is called a "Long Range Acoustic Device" or "LRAD" and can be used to notify people in case of a major disaster or emergency event.

The manufacturer's product page is here.

Also see the photos to the right.

Story tags » EverettSnohomishVerlotPoliceEmergency Planning

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