Win tickets to Evergreen State Fair concert
The Herald of Everett, Washington
Customer service  |  Subscribe   |   Log in or sign up   |   Advertising information   |   Contact us
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up  Green editions icon Green editions

Younger Americans still utilize public libraries, survey finds

SHARE: facebook Twitter icon Linkedin icon Google+ icon Email icon |  PRINTER-FRIENDLY  |  COMMENTS
Los Angeles Times
Published:
LOS ANGELES - Think teens and 20-somethings who are used to looking up everything on smartphones have little use for the public library?
Think again.
People in their 20s and older teens are just as likely as older Americans to have visited a public library in the last year - and about as likely to have taken out books or browsed the shelves once they got there, a new study from the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project finds. Nearly two out of three said they had a library card.
Young people do use libraries differently from older adults: They are nearly twice as likely to have used computers and the Internet there, and much more likely to have hung out in libraries to study or read, Pew found. They were less likely to have gotten help from a librarian.
Yet 80 percent of Americans between the ages of 16 and 29 said librarians were "very important," the survey found. Three out of four said it was crucial that libraries offer books to borrow - just as many said the same about free access to computers and the Internet.
"Younger Americans don't seem to be radically different from older adults in their conception of the library," Kathryn Zickuhr, a Pew research analyst, said. "They think libraries should have books. They think libraries should have librarians. They think libraries should have quiet spaces."
Pew also looked at reading habits of young Americans in general. In its survey, 82 percent of people ages 16 to 29 said they had read at least one book in any format in the last year - bigger percentages than among older adults.
Though that might not be surprising to see among teenagers still in high school, reading was also slightly higher for people in their 20s compared with older adults, the study found.
Researchers also found that those in their 30s and 40s were most likely to have read an e-book. Nearly a third said they had read one in the last year, more than younger people and far more than among those 50 or older, the study found.
"E-reading is still fairly new," Zickuhr said. "We're not seeing very high rates of e-reading amongst younger adults. But that could rise and affect the image of the library."
The Pew survey included more than 2,200 people contacted via telephone, including land lines and cellphones, in October and November of last year.

More Nation & World Headlines

NEWSLETTER

HeraldNet Headlines

Top stories and breaking news updates

Calendar

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus