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Published: Thursday, July 4, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

More gardeners are preserving herbs

  • Chives grow in a kitchen garden near Langley.

    Dean Fosdick / Associated Press

    Chives grow in a kitchen garden near Langley.

Culinary herbs are among the hottest trends in gardening. They also are popular among families who preserve fresh foods for later use.
Nearly 70 percent of home-canners are growing herbs, second only to tomatoes, said Lauren Devine-Hager, a product research and test-kitchen scientist with Jarden Home Brands, which manufactures the classic Ball home-canning Mason jars.
Jarden is paying more attention to that fast-emerging market by developing new recipes, new methods of preservation, and new products for short- and long-term storage, Devine-Hager said.
"When we ask people what herbs they're growing, they tell us No. 1 is basil, followed by chives, cilantro and dill," she said. "These are all great for adding flavor to meals without using much if any salt."
People also are using herbs in ways they haven't traditionally been used, said Daniel Gasteiger, author of "Yes You Can! And Freeze and Dry It, Too."
"Many people just want to know what's in their food," said Meagan Bradley, a vice president of marketing for The Legacy Companies, which markets the Excalibur line of dehydrators. "They're using their own herbs and dehydrating -- making seasonings by grinding it up."
Food preservation is a great way to stock up on essentials, Bradley said. "Maybe they work long hours or they want something to tide them over during hurricanes," she said.
Other things to remember when preserving herbs:
•Herbs are among the easiest plants to grow, and can be planted inside, on window sills, or outside in gardens or containers.
•Herbs can be grown from seed, making them inexpensive.
•Shelf life varies depending upon the type of herb, the amount of moisture removed and storage conditions.
•The best time to harvest herbs for drying is just before the flowers first open, when they are in the "bursting bud stage," the University of Georgia's National Center for Home Food Preservation says. Gather herbs in the morning to minimize wilting.
•Many people dry or freeze fresh herbs, while others add them to vinegars, oils, butters, alcoholic drinks, sea salt, soaps and jellies. Preservation in those cases often involves short-term refrigeration or long-term freezing.
•Dry herbs are more concentrated and have a stronger flavor than fresh herbs. "A recipe calling for a tablespoon of fresh basil would call for a half-tablespoon of dried basil," said Angelica Asbury, a culinary analyst with The Legacy Companies.

Story tags » FoodCookingGardening

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