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Published: Tuesday, July 16, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Olympic medalist gives TV gamers a 'Minute to Win It'

  • Olympic medalist Apolo Ohno is the new master of ceremonies for GSN's "Minute to Win It."

    MCT

    Olympic medalist Apolo Ohno is the new master of ceremonies for GSN's "Minute to Win It."

It took champion skater Apolo Ohno years to earn his eight Olympic medals, but now he's granting contestants 60 seconds to win their award.
As host of GSN's "Minute to Win It" competition, Ohno knows what it feels like to teeter on the brink of failure.
But, for him, that precipice made all the difference.
The champion short track speed skater from Federal Way remembers when all that glittered was not gold or even bronze.
"When I was 14 years old I was No. 1 in the U.S. When I was 15 years old I got last place in the same competition during the trials," said Ohno whose early years were spent training and racing in Snohomish County.
"It was very close to me either hanging up my skates and pursuing something different or continuing on this course. That was a turning point for me," Ohno said.
"It was a lack of experience and lack of willingness to succeed," he said.
"The skills came to me very easily, so it didn't require me to focus too much.
"So when I got last place at the Olympic trials and didn't make the team, that's when I began to pay my dues. And I didn't like that feeling."
Ohno's parents split when he was a baby, and he was raised by his father who always urged him to excel. "My dad saw it as an opportunity to learn a life lesson.
He said, 'Whatever you do in life you should really pursue it 100 percent rather than just go through the motions.' I realized if I'm going to try something I'm going to really try to do it. I think it was my father, he was upset that I went through the whole season without really applying myself.
"I could've made the team. I should've trained harder. I would've trained harder -- those ifs, ands and buts, those are the things that can haunt you for the rest of your life in any career," Ohno said.
"If you leave no stone unturned in your preparation and still don't succeed, at least you can say, 'You know what? I couldn't do any more.'"
His dad encouraged him to channel his drive. "I had a ton of energy, ran around like crazy -- more than a handful for my dad.
"So I just needed something to divert my attentions to, and that was sports."
His first sport was swimming. "I started very young, but I progressed very quickly. It teaches you structure, discipline, teamwork, how to win, how to lose and hard work. And it takes a lot of energy to play sports."
Even though he no longer competes in athletics, he has not lost his ambition or his confidence.
He appeared twice on "Dancing With the Stars," winning the first time and returning for the "All-Stars" show. He finagled a stint in a movie and has appeared on various TV shows.
"I wanted to go back on 'Dancing With the Stars,' I did it. One of my favorite shows is 'Hawaii Five-0.' I went on, guest starred. I wanted to be in a film, did 'Tasmanian Devils' in Vancouver. Wanted to host a show, boom, did it."
Ohno, 31, also either owns, directs or has founded six companies in the field of textiles, food, clothes and processing, which involves constant international travel.
"I have my speed skating Olympic pursuits, I have my personal life and have my business life and have my entertainment-TV-Hollywood -- whatever have you -- always compartmentalizing every aspect of my life."
Story tags » Television

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