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Published: Tuesday, August 20, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Film 'gems' for families of dementia sufferers

Caregivers and families of dementia sufferers are invited to a free film presentation by occupational therapist Teepa Snow at 1 p.m. Aug. 28 at the Stillaguamish Senior Center.
The film, called "The Senior Gems," is based on Snow's way of identifying what stage a person is at to know how best to care for them.
The "gem" stages are:
  • Sapphire, normal aging
  • Diamond, first signs of dementia
  • Emerald, early stage of dementia
  • Amber, midstage dementia
  • Ruby, mid- to late-stage dementia
  • Pearl, late-stage dementia
Snow trains and consults for health care professionals and and counsels families privately nationwide.
The Stillaguamish Senior Center is at 18308 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington. Call Debra at 360-653-4551, ext. 236, or email caregiver@stillycenter.com for more information.
Herald staff
Story tags » Senior issues

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