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Wolverine study subject of lecture

  • A research team works on a trapped and sedated wolverine.

    submitted photo

    A research team works on a trapped and sedated wolverine.

  • Keith Aubry, a scientist with the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, stands in front of a wolverine trap.

    submitted photo

    Keith Aubry, a scientist with the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, stands in front of a wolverine trap.

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Herald Staff
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  • A research team works on a trapped and sedated wolverine.

    submitted photo

    A research team works on a trapped and sedated wolverine.

  • Keith Aubry, a scientist with the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, stands in front of a wolverine trap.

    submitted photo

    Keith Aubry, a scientist with the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, stands in front of a wolverine trap.

EVERETT -- A scientist with the U.S. Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station plans to talk this Thursday about wolverines in the North Cascades.
Keith Aubry is scheduled to begin the discussion at 7 p.m. at the Northwest Stream Center, 600 128th Street SE, Everett, in Snohomish County's McCollum Park.
Aubry has been studying wolverines in the North Cascades since 2006, when he became the first researcher to radio-collar a wolverine anywhere in the Pacific states.
One of the first wolverines he collared, an adult male named Rocky, was recaptured and monitored during 2012, when he mated with two females -- Xena and Mallory.
The two dens that Aubry's team located last year are the first wolverine reproductive dens ever described in this region.
Wolverines are meat eaters and they vigorously defend their food with nasty claws and very sharp teeth. While there are old stories about this 25- to 35-pound creature ripping out the throat of a bull elk, they generally scavenge on carrion or prey on marmots and ground squirrels.
Wolverines have been often considered to be loners, but new evidence is emerging that wolverines may be more social than once thought.
The presentation is part of the Streamkeeper Academy, which is geared for middle school students to adults. Registration in advance is required by calling 425-316-8592; $7, or $5 for members.
For other Streamkeeper Academy events, check www.streamkeeper.org.
Story tags » Nature

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