The Herald of Everett, Washington
Customer service  |  Subscribe   |   Log in or sign up   |   Advertising information   |   Contact us
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up  Green editions icon Green editions
Everett Public Library staff |
Published: Friday, September 27, 2013, 8:00 a.m.

Did you know? (tree edition)

  • EPLS catalog

That "fog-drip" can account for ten or more inches of precipitation a year and up to 35% of a forest's annual water supply in the northwest. I found this fact on page 67 in the book Trees & Forests of America by Tim Palmer. A tree's needles absorb the moisture-laden air, which liquefies on the surfaces of the needles, accumulates and eventually drips to the ground, nourishing the tree.

There are many books on tree identification. You can get them specific to the West Coast, the Olympics, the Pacific Northwest, or we even have one for Trees of Seattle. I personally like the National Geographic Field Guide to the Trees of North America. It has color pictures and descriptions of tree "parts" to make identification easy.

When a tree dies, it is really a new beginning. Insects, birds and small animals take up residence and moss and lichens grow on their new "home". Sometimes dead trees are hollow or have roots exposed leaving room for larger animals. Dead Log Alive by Jo S Kittinger has informative facts and shows great pictures of all kinds of activity around and on a dead snag.

The Western Hemlock is the Washington State tree. Didn't know we had a state tree? All states do! The book State Trees: Including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico by Sue R Brandt tells you about all of them and includes pictures of these majestic beauties.

There are many, many poems and stories written about trees: The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein, Christmas Trees and Birches by Robert Frost, A Tree is Nice by Janice May Udry, The Family Tree by David McPhail, The Lorax by Dr. Seuss. One of my favorites is My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George, where Sam Gribley lives off the land in a hollow tree after learning everything he needs to know to survive at the library!

While you are thinking about trees, don't forget about your "family tree"! There is a genealogy database at the library called Ancestry Library Edition that you can use at the library, or check out the book Secrets of Tracing your Ancestors by W. Daniel Quillen to get you started.

Be sure to visit A Reading Life for more reviews and news of all things happening at the Everett Public Library.

Story tags » Books

Subscribe to Weekend to-do list
See sample | Privacy policy

Most recent A Reading Life posts

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus
digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

» More life
HeraldNet Classifieds