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Published: Sunday, October 6, 2013, 4:47 p.m.

Tribal remains buried after decades at museum

PORT ANGELES -- The remains of a native woman who likely lived on the North Olympic Peninsula centuries ago have been returned to the earth after being held at a Seattle museum for decades.
The Peninsula Daily News reported that the Lower Elwha Klallam tribal members buried the remains at Tse-whit-zen site, the historic location of one of the largest prehistoric Klallam villages.
The remains were found on the peninsula in the 1920s and have been at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture in Seattle for 73 years. They were returned to the tribe earlier this summer.
A museum spokeswoman says the Burke consulted with several tribes to determine which should take possession of the remains since the woman's tribal affiliation couldn't be determined. The Lower Elwha Klallam ultimately took them.
Story tags » American IndianPort Angeles

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