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Published: Saturday, October 12, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

Roads, traffic safety issue in Marysville council race

  • Marysville City Council, Position 7
Scott Allen, left, Kamille Norton, right,

    Marysville City Council, Position 7 Scott Allen, left, Kamille Norton, right,

MARYSVILLE -- Better, safer roads in Marysville are at the heart of their campaigns.
Scott Allen is making his second bid to join the City Council and Councilwoman Kamille Norton is running for election to the Position 7 seat she was appointed to in February.
"I want voters to know that I am a mom and a committed citizen with no other motive or aspiration than to do what is right for our community," Norton said. "I have shown a willingness to work. I have developed partnerships, having shown that I can be trusted. Voters want people who can work together for our community."
Allen, a member of the city parks board, said he is a product of Marysville schools and is in touch with the community.
"My parents volunteered here and I do, too. I know the value of hard work and have shown my interest in serving the people of Marysville," Allen said. "My first priority is the safety of our children. We need to keep our city in good repair and our roads safe for drivers, people on bikes and pedestrians."
While their goals are similar, the candidates disagree on how best to get people around the train traffic and improve city streets.
"The train tracks throughout the city provide a real glitch in our overall services," Allen said. "If we have long coal trains traveling through Marysville several times a day, how are we going to deal with 20-minute waits to get through the lights? It's absolutely unsafe."
For several years, Allen has suggested that the best alternative would be an I-5 offramp that empties directly onto State Avenue, paid for by the state and federal governments.
Allen's idea is too costly, said Norton, who supports an idea to turn the intersection of Highway 529 and I-5 into a freeway interchange, with onramps and offramps to and from the new Highway 529 bridge into downtown. The state Department of Transportation has expressed interest in the interchange, she said.
"It would allow our residents to get into and out of the city without getting stuck at the railway crossing," Norton said. "This is a big issue. We need to take the traffic pressure off downtown."
Allen also has spoken out about the condition of Sunnyside Boulevard, which he believes has not been paved since 1972 and is unsafe for drivers and walkers.
"I inherited the house I grew up in on Sunnyside, and its condition is what got me involved," Allen said. "With our population growing, we need to make that street safe."
Norton defended the city's work on Sunnyside.
"Just a few years ago, the city added a walkway lane to a portion of the road," Norton said. "The city continues to try to address our needs, working within our limited budget. In July, the council adopted a six-year transportation improvement plan that includes the expansion of a portion of the (Sunnyside Boulevard) and the addition of sidewalks."
Norton said she wants the 156th Street freeway overpass bridge turned into an I-5 interchange as well. That's been the plan all along and the interchange would benefit the growth of the manufacturing jobs center in the Smokey Point area, she said.
Allen said he is concerned about safety in and around schools in Marysville. If elected, he would like to be part of an effort to make sure the city is doing all it can to provide a safe environment for kids.
"Do we need changes as they pertain to kids?" Allen said. "I want to assist in any way I can."
Norton said she believes Marysville police are doing their best to combat illegal drug activity, theft, graffiti and other crime.
"As far as the schools go, we have a great partnership with the school district," Norton said. "We all are doing the best we can with tough budgets."
Gale Fiege: 425-339-3427; gfiege@heraldnet.com.
Meet the candidates
The job: At stake is a two-year term on the Marysville City Council. The job pays $700 a month, with an additional $50 paid per extra meeting, with up to 10 extra meetings allowed each month.
Kamille Norton
Age: 36
Experience: Appointed in February to her City Council seat. Business degree. Serves on Marysville salary and civil service commissions. Volunteer work includes PTSA, Cub Scouts, YMCA, Boys & Girls Clubs, Marysville Select Girls Basketball and her church.
Website: www.votekamillenorton.com
Scott Allen
Age: 58
Experience: Works for Boeing. Ran a previous unsuccessful campaign for City Council. Marysville city parks and recreation board member. Volunteer work includes Marysville Kiwanis, Sunrise Rotary and his church.
Website: tinyurl.com/FacebookScottAllen
Story tags » MarysvilleRailroadLocal electionsTraffic SafetyTraffic

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