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Everett Public Library staff | libref@everettwa.gov
Published: Tuesday, November 26, 2013, 8:00 a.m.

Physician heal thyself

I'm not sure exactly when the shift happened, but doctors, in the real world at least, are no longer considered infallible gods. This is great when it comes to getting second opinions and not being railroaded into unnecessary treatments. There is, however, a downside: the perils of self-diagnosis. You see, without an authority figure (I tend to imagine Spock or Tuvok) to say "the chances of you being inflicted with such a disorder are infinitesimal" my fevered brain tends to see a deadly and rare disorder in the slightest cough or rash. Luckily, perhaps, the library has many tomes to guide me on my journey of disease self-discovery.

It is always best to start with the classics. The two heavy hitters are Current Medical Diagnosis & Treatment (CMDT) and The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy. Such scintillating titles no? Both are geared toward the medical professional and provide rational, current and highly technical information on almost every disease and its symptoms, that you could possibly think of. Just don't expect much sugar coating. Also avoid looking at the diagnostic images at all cost.

If ice cold logic doesn't put your mind at rest, perhaps it is time to admit that the problem lies in the fear of disease itself or as the professionals like to say, hypochondria. Luckily, you are not alone. There are many tomes dedicated to individuals who struggle with the fear of disease. Best of all, they tend to use liberal doses of humor to describe their plight. Here are a few examples:

Well Enough Alone: A Cultural History of My Hypochondria by Jennifer Traig Convinced she was having a heart attack at 18 (the college nurse's reply: It's a gorgeous day and you're not dying) the author realized that she just might have a problem. This book is a witty, and often hilarious, self-examination of all the foibles of a woman convinced she has every disease known to man. Each chapter not only highlights her own "issues" but also puts her hypochondria in a historical perspective with amusing anecdotes from the past.

Hyper-Chondriac: One Man's Quest to Hurry Up and Calm Down by Brian FrazerFrazer definitely suffers from hypochondria, as a child he came down with a new disease every month, but this book is also a far ranging quest to find relaxation and, for lack of a better term, inner peace. He tries reiki, yoga, Zoloft, Craniosacral therapy, Ayurveda, dog walking, and even, gasp, knitting. Sadly none of them seem to fully rid him of his demons, but the hilarious journey is well worth it. For the reader in any case.

The Hypochondriacs: Nice Tormented Lives by Brian DillonAnother subtitle for this book could be: misery loves company. After reading about these nine famous suffers and their quirks, you probably won't feel so bad about any fears of disease that you might have. While each sufferer's oddities are definitely amusing, this work also highlights the interesting connection between each malady and the individual's creativity. In several cases, such as Charlotte Bronte, the illnesses, both real and imagined, provided a means of escape as well as inspiration.

The Hypochondriacs Guide to Life and Death by Gene Weingarten While there is a smattering of actual medical information throughout this work, this is pure satire and all the better for it. The author introduces you to his own neuroses, and then tries to convince you that you should have them as well. The chapter titles (such as 'How Your Doctor Can Kill You' and 'Pregnant? That's Wonderful! Don't Read This!') tell you all you need to know about the contents of this book. There are even helpful quizzes to confirm your paranoia.

So you now have all the tools you need to calm your irrational fear of disease. I'm sure you will be fine. Well, maybe not.

Be sure to visit A Reading Life for more reviews and news of all things happening at the Everett Public Library.

Story tags » Books

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