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Injuries, losses prompted MLB to pass collision ban

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By Ronald Blum
Associated Press
Published:
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- Baseball officials are up front about this: They want to ban home plate collisions to guard their investments.
Minnesota's Joe Mauer, a former MVP and three-time batting champion, is less than halfway through a $184 million, eight-year contract. He was limited to 75 games at catcher this year in a concussion-shortened season.
Buster Posey, another MVP and batting champ, has a $167 million, nine-year deal. San Francisco wants to ensure that he doesn't have another horrific injury like the one that ended his 2011 season.
That's why Major League Baseball's rules committee voted this week to prohibit runners from plowing into catchers. The rule will take effect next season if the players' association agrees, and in 2015 if the union doesn't.
"It's a great change. We protect our assets," Los Angeles Angels general manager Jerry Dipoto said Thursday as the winter meetings ended. "Some of the things we've seen happen in the recent past -- Buster Posey, concussions with Joe Mauer, Yadier Molina getting blown up, they are some of the best players in the game. They mean so much to their team -- the financial investments involved. And more importantly, the health of the individual."
This year's winter meetings likely will be remembered most for the rules decision.
There were just six trades -- two more than during last year's session. As the meetings ended, the Chicago Cubs acquired Justin Ruggiano from Miami for Brian Bogusevic in a swap of outfielders, Seattle completed its $240 million, 10-year contract with All-Star second baseman Robinson Cano, Boston finalized a $32 million, two-year agreement with first baseman Mike Napoli, and Washington completed a two-year deal with outfielder Nate McLouth.
In one-year deals pending physicals, outfielder Michael Morse agreed with San Francisco at $6 million, right-hander Roberto Hernandez with Philadelphia and reliever Joba Chamberlain with Detroit.
Crashes at home plate have been a baseball tradition and a staple of television highlight shows. Some traditionalists such as career hits leader Pete Rose are against a change.
But some in MLB management fear continuing the status quo could lead to possible liability.
"I think it's always been in a lot of people's minds as odd that we allow collisions there and we don't really allow them at other bases," Los Angeles Dodgers President Stan Kasten said. "I think it's frankly overdue."
Story tags » Major League Baseball

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