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Published: Sunday, January 5, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

Learn natural pest control from book on beneficial bugs

  • Most people want insects out of their gardens and yards. Jessica Walliser invites them in. Walliser, an organic gardening advocate, makes the case for...

    Most people want insects out of their gardens and yards. Jessica Walliser invites them in. Walliser, an organic gardening advocate, makes the case for natural pest management in Attracting Beneficial Bugs to Your Garden. She favors an approach that lets nature take its course, with a little human oversight. Nature, Walliser says, works best when it's allowed to stay in balance. (Akron Beacon Journal/MCT)

  • Most people want insects out of their gardens and yards. Jessica Walliser invites them in. Walliser, an organic gardening advocate, makes the case for...

    Most people want insects out of their gardens and yards. Jessica Walliser invites them in. Walliser, an organic gardening advocate, makes the case for natural pest management in Attracting Beneficial Bugs to Your Garden. She favors an approach that lets nature take its course, with a little human oversight. Nature, Walliser says, works best when it's allowed to stay in balance. (Akron Beacon Journal/MCT)

Jessica Walliser, an organic gardening advocate, makes the case for natural pest management in "Attracting Beneficial Bugs to Your Garden." She favors an approach that lets nature take its course, with a little human oversight.
Nature, Walliser says, works best when it's allowed to stay in balance. Even bad bugs aren't entirely bad in the garden, she argues. After all, they attract the beneficial bugs that prey on them.
Walliser introduces her readers to some common beneficial bugs and the plants that are best at attracting them. She also guides readers in creating insectary borders and companion plantings designed to encourage natural enemies to do battle in a way that's healthy for the garden.
"Attracting Beneficial Bugs to Your Garden: A Natural Approach to Pest Control" sells for $24.95 in softcover.
Story tags » BooksGardening

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