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High-density threat still exists

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Apodments are not dead in Snohomish! The name has been changed to fool the public.
The threat of ultra-high density in single-family zones is back. This time, 25 units for double or single occupancy on two city lots. The project is proposed for senior assisted living, but nothing guarantees it will not be converted to apodments after the property is sold. With potentially 30 or more residents, 12 staff and multiple delivery vehicles neighborhood impact will be considerable.
The issues are the same as with the apodments — density, traffic, parking, infrastructure, and overextending emergency services. Throw in large signage and a parking lot on the front lawn. This project cannot fail to have a negative impact on any quiet neighborhood.
The request for a conditional use permit for this project comes from Christopher Koh, the developer involved in the apodment issue.
Less than year ago, 800 residents signed petitions against ultra high-density in single family zones. A record number of 200 people crammed the council meeting in protest. The city acquiesced and the permit was refused.
It was agreed that ordinances needed rewriting to clarify the rules. However, when a moratorium was requested during the review period, the city built stone walls at every corner. Little or no effort has gone into this project since.
Will the city of Snohomish ever listen to its citizens?
Colleen Dunlap

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