The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions

Calendar


Weekend to-do list
HeraldNet Newsletter Delivered to your inbox each week.
Published: Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 1:00 a.m.

Music: ‘Dad rock’ classics that should be in junior’s collection

  • Mick Jagger struts across the stage at a 1976 concert. The Rolling Stones’ 1972 album “Exile on Main Street” is an essential baby bo...

    Mick Jagger struts across the stage at a 1976 concert. The Rolling Stones’ 1972 album “Exile on Main Street” is an essential baby boomer record.

Bob Dylan, “Highway 61 Revisited” (1965): Going electric rankled folk fans, but Dylan expanded his audience and influenced a generation with songs that have been analyzed (and lionized) ever since.
The Beatles, “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” (1967): The culmination of years of artistic maturation and bold experimentation. The original rock concept LP.
Marvin Gaye “What’s Goin’ On” (1971): The sexy love man embraced civil rights and inner-city turmoil as subject matter, changing the tone of R&B, both lyrically and musically.
Carole King “Tapestry” (1971): King’s songs of love lost, found and wasted spoke to the Me Generation’s turn toward introspection.
Led Zeppelin, “Led Zeppelin IV” (1971): Mystical and bombastic, acoustic and brash, Led Zeppelin’s untitled fourth album defined ’70s rock (and FM radio).
The Rolling Stones, “Exile on Main Street” (1972): Incorporating blues, soul, country and even gospel, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards dug deep into the era’s spiritual malaise and made the Stones’ most emotional album.
Stevie Wonder, “Innervisions” (1973): The best of a series of innovative, hit-filled albums Wonder made in a 1970s creative surge, it changed the sound of popular music.
Eagles, “Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975” (1976): Anchored by Don Henley and Glen Frey, this Southern California band was both romantic and cynical, diluting any sweetness with a bitter edge that reflected the compromises of adulthood.
Bob Marley & the Wailers, “Exodus” (1977): The sensual, spiritual album that helped make reggae one of the most popular musical genres in the world.
“Saturday Night Fever,” soundtrack (1977): The percolating rhythms of disco acts like K.C. & the Sunshine Band, Tavares and, of course, the Bee Gees captured the zest, decadence and hustling of the dance boom.
Nelson George, AARP Media
Story tags » Rock Music

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus

HeraldNet highlights

First stop for tourists
First stop for tourists: County tourism volunteers inform, point the way
Remembering Jerry
Remembering Jerry: EvCC groundskeeper Gerald Olmstead was always happy
An untapped market
An untapped market: Sound to Summit is first brewery taproom in Snohomish
Saving the trees
Saving the trees: Learn from arborist how to keep your trees healthy
SnoCoSocial