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Published: Thursday, February 27, 2014, 5:45 p.m.

Meth, heroin sold from Arlington dog day care, agents say

ARLINGTON — An Arlington man, who once escaped a Texas prison and snitched on a former Hells Angel during a murder trial, is back behind bars, accused of running a drug ring out of his dog-boarding business.
Federal agents say Shawn Lundy used the Arlington Doggy Day Care as a front for a bustling heroin and methamphetamine business. The kennel was raided Tuesday as part of a Drug Enforcement Administration investigation. The Snohomish Regional Drug and Gang Task Force assisted.
Search teams on Tuesday allegedly seized about two pounds of heroin, a half pound of meth and “sizeable amounts of cash,” from the business, according to documents filed in U.S. District Court in Seattle.
The drugs reportedly were concealed in a dog kennel. Agents also found cash buried under a dog house, court papers said. A secret compartment in the business also revealed counterfeit $20 bills, agents reported.
Lundy, 60, is charged with drug distribution and possession. Several other people also are facing federal charges, including a handful of men suspected of supplying Lundy with heroin.
Another man, David Funk Jr., also known as “Super Dave,” was arrested on Tuesday. He reportedly admitted to selling heroin and meth for Lundy.
Lundy caught the attention of narcotics detectives in August. A DEA agent tried to scope out the Arlington Doggy Day Care, court papers said. Within two hours of setting up surveillance, Lundy reportedly parked his vehicle in the middle of the road and challenged a federal agent, who was in an undercover car parked nearby.
Lundy reportedly was heard saying, “I know what this is about,” and “(expletive) police,” court papers said.
Then earlier this month a confidential informant told cops that Funk, aka “Super Dave,” was selling heroin for Lundy.
Funk lives in a trailer on the property, located in the 9900 block of Highway 530. Police say they used the informant to buy about $40 worth of heroin from Funk earlier this month.
On Tuesday, as police swarmed the property, Lundy reportedly ran from his vehicle and locked himself in a building, court papers said. Agents forced their way in and arrested him.
Investigators searched the property, locating a pillowcase with a large amount of money inside. They found electronic benefit transfer cards that belonged to other people in a cabinet, along with counterfeit $20 bills.
They also found a business card for Lundy’s federal probation officer.
Lundy allegedly led them to his secreted drug stash and cash. He also admitted that he had ordered two pounds of heroin a couple days ago from a group in Federal Way and expected the drugs to be delivered that night, court papers said.
Later that evening, Jose Guadalupe Saldana reportedly arrived with a two-pound brick of heroin, court papers said.
Also that night, three hours after being called, a car full of people arrived at the doggy day care. Joel Lagarde Ortega reportedly was carrying a backpack with a large quantity of heroin inside. Another man, Alexis Pacheco Gonzalez, allegedly admitted that the heroin belonged to him, court paper said. Two other people in the car, a man and woman, reportedly were being paid $200 to drive the drugs to Arlington.
A third supplier, Mayra Solis Santos, and a boy also showed up with heroin after being called Tuesday afternoon.
Lundy is no stranger to the inside of a prison cell.
He was busted in 2000 for money laundering and growing marijuana in Arlington. He was sentenced to a decade in federal prison. Lundy was serving his sentence in Texas when he escaped in 2007. He was arrested about a week later in Arlington.
Lundy was in the federal detention center in Sea-Tac when he got to know Rodney Rollness, a former Hells Angel.
Rollness was awaiting trial for the 2001 murder of Michael “Santa” Walsh. Rollness shot Walsh because he claimed to be a Hells Angel. Rollness and another man earned “Filthy Few” patches, indicating that they killed for the outlaw motorcycle club.
Rollness, of Snohomish, also was part of the criminal racketeering investigation that netted Richard “Smilin’ Rick” Fabel, the president of the club’s Washington Nomads chapter.
Lundy testified during the 10-week trial. He told jurors that Rollness confessed to him that he killed Walsh.
Lundy also admitted during the trial that he’d been in the drug business since 1984, selling marijuana and cocaine. He was indicted in 1990 in Connecticut for trafficking pounds of cocaine. That’s when he started working with the Drug Enforcement Administration.
He was a confidential informant across the country for a year and a half, court papers said. He cooperated with the federal prosecution of more than a dozen people, sparing himself decades behind bars.
Lundy said he fled the East Coast and moved to Arlington in 1994. He didn’t quit the drug business, though. He operated marijuana grows and also went back to selling cocaine. He was arrested in 2000 after being caught with about 1,000 marijuana plants.
Once again, Lundy cooperated with investigators and a potential 20-year prison sentence was reduced to a decade. Lundy’s testimony in 2007 helped secure convictions for Fabel and Rollness.
His cooperation spared him any additional time for breaking out of the Texas prison. The federal Bureau of Prisons says he was released in 2011.
Diana Hefley: 425-339-3463, hefley@heraldnet.com.
Story tags » ArlingtonDrug Trafficking

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