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Everett Public Library staff | libref@everettwa.gov
Published: Thursday, March 13, 2014, 8:00 a.m.

A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby

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My co-worker Leslie recently wrote a post about books that are going to be made into movies. Nick Hornby's A Long Way Down is one of them. He's also the author of About a Boy and High Fidelity. Hey, both of those are movies too.

It all starts on New Year's Eve when four very different people climb onto a roof to commit suicide. Suicide is a solitary job. You want to be left alone with your thoughts, which is ironic since your thoughts are what make you want to commit suicide. Group suicide is for Jim Jones and those Heaven's Gates people. .

Martin is a washed up talk show host (think Good Morning America but British) who spent time in prison for having sex with a 15-year-old girl. His career is dead. He's now the host of a local TV station that is viewed by maybe 30 people. His ex-wife won't let him see his daughters. He doesn't want to see them either because he feels like a washed-up loser. He decides he's done with his life and climbs on top of a roof that's known for jumpers when he's interrupted by a fellow would-be jumper.

Jess is a mess. Not even a hot mess because being a hot mess implies you were something grand and slightly astonishing at one point and now there's nothing left but a glimmer of that. Jess's dad is an education minister (for some reason I see a preacher in a church throwing literature books at people) and she finds ways of embarrassing him and her mother on a daily basis. Her older sister Jen went missing. Jen didn't leave a note or any clues as to where she went. Jess's parents thinks Jen is dead and they go about their lives as if this is common knowledge and they rarely say her name. Jess is wonderfully foul-mouthed, hopped up on drugs and Bacardi Breezers and still chasing after the boy who dumped her. He is the reason why she wants to jump off a building.

JJ is an American musician whose band was starting to get a following when they decided to call it quits. He had a girlfriend, a promising music career and then nothing. The music came to a grinding halt, his girlfriend left him and then he and his best friend parted ways. He'd gone from touring cities with his band to being a pizza delivery boy and decided he'd kill himself on New Year's Eve.

Maureen is in her 50's and has a severely handicapped son. She's sheltered and lonely and shy. As much as she loves her son Matty, she can't do it anymore. She can't stand to see the days, weeks, months, and years stretch out in front of her, caring for her child who is a vegetable. She decides to climb to the top of a building and jump.

All four of them find themselves at a loss up on the roof. Nobody wants to be the first jumper, let alone commit the act in front of strangers. They start to talk. Not the kind of "Someone Saved My Life tonight" kind of talk. More like "Why are you jumping?." And each of them try to out-do one another: "My story's worse than yours."

The four of them climb down from the roof and go for a drink. They make a pact that if they still feel like killing themselves in 6 weeks' time they will go through with it.

Little by little they worm their way into each other's lives-sometimes not in a good way. Jess is a foul-mouthed brat who says anything that comes to mind. If she doesn't like you, she'll let you know. And then some. She's the character I love. And hate. Martin is still a jerk that goes between knowing he's a loser and thinking he's still TV royalty. Maureen is terrified of the world and has never been on a proper vacation. JJ is living in the past, getting embarrassed and delighted when people recognize him from "that band." What do you call a musician without a girlfriend? Homeless.

What drew me in deeper into this novel was the fact that Martin, Jess, JJ, and Maureen weren't trying to save each other's lives by putting suicide on hold. It was more of "Let's go get a drink or nine, play 'My life sucks more than yours ever could,' and see what happens tomorrow." Not once does this book get preachy or anti-suicide.

Suicide is an uncomfortable topic whether it's talked about or not. A Long Way Down smashes that uneasiness and says it with honesty: people think about killing themselves. The thought bubbles up and most times it goes away. In the end, Martin, Jess, JJ, and Maureen don't become best friends and vacation in Maui. But they do go through something that connects them.

Nick Hornby is a hilarious writer and he deals with a subject that makes a lot of people cringe. Since I like books about people who are (or seem) more messed up than me this was the perfect book.

I haven't gone looking for a roof to jump off in three days.

Be sure to visit A Reading Life for more reviews and news of all things happening at the Everett Public Library.

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