The Herald of Everett, Washington
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up | Manage  Green editions icon Green editions

Calendar


HeraldNet Headlines
HeraldNet Newsletter Delivered to your inbox each week.
Published: Friday, March 21, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

New owners want Historic Everett Theatre to be centerpiece of downtown

  • Seattle Seahawks fans celebrate as the Seattle Seahawks score a touchdown during the second quarter of the Super Bowl XLVIII at a Super Bowl party at ...

    Sofia Jaramillo / The Herald

    Seattle Seahawks fans celebrate as the Seattle Seahawks score a touchdown during the second quarter of the Super Bowl XLVIII at a Super Bowl party at the Historic Everett Theatre on Feb. 2. The theater board’s goal is to bring well-known performers to the Historic Everett Theatre, as well as establish drama classes for children.

EVERETT — The 112-year-old Historic Everett Theatre is under new ownership, and its board has big plans.
Carrying the financing for the theater now is Craig Shriner, a retired Woodinville real estate businessman and brother of Everett Theatre Society board member Curt Shriner of Everett.
The board will continue to ensure the historical integrity of the building and make sure it remains a venue for community theater, comedy nights, vaudeville, silent movies, film noir, fundraisers and a variety of concerts.
The goal, however, is to bring in well-known performers, add some drama and film classes for children and establish a mid-week “date night” movie series drawn from films that debuted at the Sundance Film Festival, where Craig Shriner volunteers each year.
The theater already has booked Little River Band, which was especially popular from the mid-1970s through the mid-1980s with such hits as “Lonesome Loser” and “Take It Easy On Me.” The band is scheduled to perform at 8 p.m. April 25.
On May 24, award-winning blues man Curtis Salgado will play the Historic Everett Theatre.
Earlier this month, Craig Shriner bought the note on the theater previously held by the nonprofit Snohomish County Music Project, which has made its home in the Everett Music Hall at the Everett Mall.
The note, donated to the music project by the Schack family of Everett, was at some point worth about $250,000, Curt Shriner said.
The Shriner brothers were reluctant to give more information about the sale. Rather, they want to talk about the theater’s future.
“The board of the theater has always struggled to have enough money to attract big names,” Curt Shriner said. “We want the theater to be the center of attention again in downtown Everett. We’re really excited about getting this puppy back where it belongs and help make Everett a destination, not an afterthought.”
Everett Public Library’s resident historian David Dilgard calls the Historic Everett Theatre the grand old dame of Everett, the last and best of the opera houses that opened in Everett after the turn of the previous century.
Craig Shriner said he could not resist the opportunity to help.
“It’s a great place and we just want to see it operating to its fullest potential,” he said.
Gale Fiege: 425-339-3427; gfiege@heraldnet.com.
Story tags » TheaterEverett

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus

HeraldNet highlights

Making noise in Everett
Making noise in Everett: Duo has big dreams for the city's music scene
Looking for a friend?
Looking for a friend?: Animals up for adoption at the Everett shelter (10 new photos)
First stop for tourists
First stop for tourists: County tourism volunteers inform, point the way
Remembering Jerry
Remembering Jerry: EvCC groundskeeper Gerald Olmstead was always happy
SnoCoSocial