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Cruise ships may over-rely on electronics

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Associated Press
Published:
HOUSTON — Cruise operators, like airline pilots, may be relying too heavily on electronics to navigate massive ships, losing the knowledge and ability needed to operate a vessel in the case of a power failure, an expert sea pilot told a federal agency Wednesday.
Capt. Jorge Viso with the Tampa Bay Pilots testified before the National Transportation Safety Board on the second day of a two-day hearing the agency is holding after several high-profile cruise mishaps, including last year’s fire aboard the Carnival Triumph that left thousands of passengers stranded for days in squalid conditions aboard a powerless ship adrift in the Gulf of Mexico.
In 2010, a fire also knocked out power to the Carnival Splendor in the Pacific Ocean, also stranding passengers at sea until the vessel could be towed to port. In 2012, the Costa Concordia ship capsized off Italy, killing 32 people.
Cruise ship captains are handling high-tech vessels with state-of-the-art navigations systems, Viso said, but added that he fears they are not as adept at manually handling the massive ships as they become over-dependent on electronics.
“We have noticed a trend for too much reliance on electronic navigation,” said Viso, who as a pilot assists large cruise ships get to port in Florida.
“If there is an instrument failure, a control failure or presentation failure there are distinct disadvantages to those not familiar with the handling of a vessel,” Viso said, comparing it to a similar phenomenon gaining attention in the airline industry. “There is a definite trend toward driving the ship electronically, and while some may argue that this is the future, we are not there today.”
Budd Darr, senior vice president for technical and regulatory affairs at Cruise Lines International Association, told the panel the size of the largest cruise ships had likely stabilized for now.
But “the average size will increase as we are not constrained by the Panama Canal anymore,” Darr said, referring to the expected opening next year of an expansion of that key crossing point.

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