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The Herald of Everett, Washington
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Published: Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 1:22 p.m.

Building the 2,000-foot berm in Oso

A temporary berm will allow rescuers to pump flood waters out of the search area along Highway 530.

Mark Mulligan / The Herald

A temporary berm will allow rescuers to pump flood waters out of the search area along Highway 530.

Workers on Tuesday began building a berm in the Oso mudslide debris field. The temporary wall of rock and dirt, which will be approximately 2,000 feet long, will drain the water from the area around C-Post Road and Highway 530, allowing search and rescue teams to access previously flooded areas.


Mark Mulligan / The Herald

The end of the berm, starting on a portion of C-Post Road and jutting out into flood waters east of the Oso mudslide. The berm, which is only a temporary structure, is nearly 600 feet into its expected 2,000-foot total length when completed.


Mark Mulligan / The Herald

A truck dumps rock at the end of the berm on Wednesday morning. The berm will allow rescuers to pump flood waters out of the search area.


Mark Mulligan / The Herald

A rubber ball sits in flood waters along C-Post Road Wednesday morning. The terrain is unpredictable because of all the assorted slide material that's come in.


Mark Mulligan / The Herald

Flood waters cover the path of C-Post Road during construction of the berm. A team of contractors is working with eight members of the Army Corps of Engineers.


Mark Mulligan / The Herald

Snohomish County Public Works Director Owen Carter talks about the construction of the berm. Dogs had been leading searchers to the area, but floodwater made it inaccessible, prompting the construction of the berm.


Mark Mulligan / The Herald

Michael Peele, standing on the right, is a civil engineer with the Army Corps of Engineers. He is working as the flood team lead in the construction of the berm.


Mark Mulligan / The Herald

A truck dumps rock at the end of the berm. Amphibious excavator vehicles were also there widening channels.

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