The Herald of Everett, Washington
Customer service  |  Subscribe   |   Log in or sign up   |   Advertising information   |   Contact us
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up  Green editions icon Green editions
Jessi Loerch | jloerch@heraldnet.com
Published: Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

Little wonders of the forest stand out in the rain

A skunk cabbage bloom in a wetland area near Camp Pigott.

Jessi Loerch

A skunk cabbage bloom in a wetland area near Camp Pigott.

The forests of the Northwest are beautiful in the rain. I've argued before that you can't really call yourself a Northwest hiker until you've hiked in the rain, on purpose.

Recently, I spent a day helping teach a navigation course with the Everett Mountaineers. The course was at Camp Pigott, near Monroe. The first part of the course is indoors, where students learn how to use a compass to plan trips, take a bearing, etc.

Then, the fun begins. Everyone goes outside and tries it out.

My favorite part of the day is a trek through the thick trees and underbrush. The goal for the students is to navigate from one point to the next using their compasses and teamwork. As an assistant, my job was to offer help as needed but mostly just let the students lead the way.

I love scrambling through the woods like this. Over logs, under logs, around bushes, up slopes. It's like being a kid again, in the best playground in the world.

As we slowly trekked uphill, I got to really enjoy the up-close beauty of a rainy forest.

Usually, I travel on trails. And I love this. But on the trails, I miss so many things. During our slow progression, I had time to really stare at the moss. I found tiny mushrooms. I admired water drops clinging to lichen.

All I had with me that day was my iPhone, but I couldn't resist snapping some photos with it. The photos here are a bit of what I saw that day.

Moss grows on the branch of a tree. The pods growing out of the moss are spore capsules, which the moss uses for reproduction.

A sword fern shines on a rainy Northwest day. Sword fern is very common in Northwest forests and it's especially beautiful on wet, misty days.

Little cup-like growths (Fungi? Lichen? Does anyone know?) cover a fallen branch amidst the jumble on the forest floor.

Story tags » HikingOutdoors

Subscribe to Explore NW
See sample | Privacy policy

Most recent Explore NW posts

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus
digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

loading...
» More life
HeraldNet Classifieds