The Herald of Everett, Washington
Customer service  |  Subscribe   |   Log in or sign up   |   Advertising information   |   Contact us
HeraldNet on Facebook HeraldNet on Twitter HeraldNet RSS feeds HeraldNet Pinterest HeraldNet Google Plus The Daily Herald on Linked In HeraldNet Youtube
HeraldNet Newsletters  Newsletters: Sign up  Green editions icon Green editions
Dan Catchpole | dcatchpole@heraldnet.com
Published: Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 12:01 a.m.

Last flying B-29 coming to Paine Field

  • Fifi, the only flying B-29 Superfortress.

    Commemorative Air Force

    Fifi, the only flying B-29 Superfortress.

MUKILTEO — Fifi is coming home.

But just for a visit.

The last flying B-29 Superfortress, Fifi, is stopping by the Historic Flight Foundation at Paine Field this summer. The bomber was built in 1945 in Boeing's Renton plant.

Visitors can look inside and even hitch a ride on the 69-year-old airplane during more than two weeks it will be in town.

A flight on Fifi isn't cheap, though. Ticket prices start at $575 for a seat in the back of the plane, where airmen operated the heavy bomber's machine guns. The best seat in the house — the bombardier's position — costs $1,495 but gives you a front-seat view.

Fifi will be open to the public June 19 through July 6 at Paine Field. The airplane is operated by the Commemorative Air Force, which restores and operates about 150 vintage aircraft.

While nearly 4,000 B-29 Superfortresses were built during and just after World War II, Fifi is the only one in flying condition.

During the war, the B-29 provided a critical heavy punch in the Allies' air campaigns against Germany and Japan. The most well-known B-29 is the Enola Gay, which dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. A second B-29, dubbed Bockscar, dropped a second atomic bomb on Nagasaki, Japan, a few days later.

The U.S. Air Force continued using them in various roles through the 1950s.

Despite the plane's important role in defeating the Axis Powers, few B-29s are still around today. More than 20 Superfortresses are on display at various museums, mostly in the U.S., and a group in Wichita, Kan., is working to restore a second B-29, dubbed Doc, to flying condition.

Before landing in Everett, the plane is scheduled to be in Olympia June 12-15 and at Seattle's Boeing Field June 16-18. After leaving Western Washington, Fifi is scheduled for stops in Spokane and Boise.

Dan Catchpole: 425-339-3454; dcatchpole@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @dcatchpole.



Story tags » BoeingGeneral AviationMilitary aviationPaine FieldWar -- history

Subscribe to Weekly business headlines
See sample | Privacy policy

Most recent Aerospace blog posts

digital subscription promo

Subscribe now

Unlimited digital access starting at 99 cents, or included with any print subscription.

loading...
» More business
HeraldNet Classifieds

HeraldNet highlights

Crow magnum
Crow magnum: As thousands darken the sky, researchers descend on Bothell
A revolution for its time
A revolution for its time: Boeing 247 makes final flight to Seattle museum (gallery, video)
From NYPD to SCSO
From NYPD to SCSO: A New York cop opts for life in a slower lane, in Sultan
Unpaid caregivers
Unpaid caregivers: There's support for the thousands who look after a loved one