Like The Herald Business Journal on Facebook!
The Herald of Everett, Washington
Customer service  |  Subscribe   |   Log in or sign up   |   Advertising information   |   Contact us
Heraldnet.com

The top local business stories in your email

Contact Us:

Josh O'Connor
Publisher
Phone: 425-339-3007
joconnor@heraldnet.com

Maureen Bozlinski
General Sales Manager
Phone: 425-339-3445
Fax: 425-339-3049
mbozlinksi@heraldnet.com

Jim Davis
Editor
Phone: 425-339-3097
jdavis@heraldnet.com

Site address:
1800 41st Street, S-300,
Everett, WA 98203

Mailing address:
P.O. Box 930
Everett, WA 98206

HBJ RSS feeds

Russian ban on ag imports to affect Idaho farmers

SHARE: facebook Twitter icon Linkedin icon Google+ icon Email icon |  PRINTER-FRIENDLY  |  COMMENTS
By Audrey Dutton
Published:
Idaho Statesman
BOISE, Idaho — Idaho farmers may feel a small sting from the new Russian ban on food and agricultural imports from the West.
Russia was the 14th largest export market for Idaho agriculture as of last year, according to the Idaho Department of Agriculture. The nation retaliated Thursday for sanctions imposed on it by western nations over the crisis in Ukraine. As a result, the Russians have banned ag imports from the West, including the U.S., European countries, Canada and Australia.
The U.S. exports about $1.2 billion in food and agricultural goods to Russia. That represents less than 1 percent of total U.S. agriculture exports. The largest U.S. export to Russia is poultry, mainly chicken, followed by tree nuts such as almonds, as well as soybeans.
About 90 percent of Idaho’s exports to Russia are safe from the ban, because live animals, mainly beef cattle and dairy heifers, aren’t on the list.
But peas and lentils are included in the ban. Idaho shipped about $1 million worth of those foods to Russia last year, according to Laura Johnson, bureau chief of the Idaho Department of Agriculture’s market development division.
“It certainly will have an impact on us,” Johnson told the Idaho Statesman.
The CEO of the U.S.A. Dry Pea and Lentil Council said the ban won’t topple that industry in Idaho, since Russia buys less than 1 percent of local pea and lentil exports. But it’s not good to lose that foothold.
“Russia has been an emerging market for us,” said Tim McGreevy, who leads the national group from his office on the border of Idaho and Washington. “We’ve been working hard on this market for the past five to six years, and you don’t like to see any market go away. . We hope it gets resolved.”
Apples also are included in the ban. While Idaho doesn’t ship many apples to Russia, the ban could have a ripple effect in Idaho if there’s a leftover supply in larger-exporting states such as Washington, Johnson said.
Both the European Union and U.S. already have seen hits to Russian exports in recent years.
In 2012, Russia bought almost $300 million in U.S. beef and $268 million in U.S. pork. Those numbers dropped to $1 million and $17 million a year later, after Russia imposed limits on those products because of a feed additive used in the U.S. called ractopamine.
Story tags » Agriculture & Fishing

MORE HBJ HEADLINES

CALENDAR

Share your comments: Log in using your HeraldNet account or your Facebook, Twitter or Disqus profile. Comments that violate the rules are subject to removal. Please see our terms of use. Please note that you must verify your email address for your comments to appear.

You are logged in using your HeraldNet ID. Click here to update your profile. | Log out.

Our new comment system is not supported in IE 7. Please upgrade your browser here.

comments powered by Disqus

Market roundup